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CALIFORNIA STATE SENATE CAREER TECHNOLOGY & NEW ECONOMY SELECT COMMITTE HEARING

Perkins & Pathways: How the New Federal Career and Technical

 Perkins & Pathways: How the New Federal Career and Technical Education Law Supports College and Career Pathways and High-Quality Linked Learning 

ONE OF THE FINEST HIGH SCHOOLS WELL THOUGHT OUT

NEW MEXICO CAREER CLUSTER GUIDE. GREAT CONCEPTS FOR THOSE WHO WANT DIRECTION AS STUDENT SEEKING A CAREER.

ONE OF THE FINEST HIGH SCHOOLS WELL THOUGHT OUT

 Designed as a facility for the next generation learner, the Dr. Kirk Lewis Career and Technical High School is a collaborative and flexible environment that offers project-based learning for real world experience. IBI Group teamed with Pasadena I.S.D. in order to offer career and technical progra 

WE COULD LEARN FROM THIS Video !

CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT RIVERSIDE HIGH  SCHOOL. AWESOME PRESENTATION VIDEO ! !

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Stop Lying to Your Kids! They SHOULD NOT, "Follow Their Passion" - Mike Rowe, explains

We LIE to our children every day and tell them to,"Follow Their Passion." Not only that, but society tells them the same thing. It's HORRIBLE advice. We should absolutely encourage our kid's passions, but that doesn't mean their passion is the right course in life. Following your passion   

Mike Rowe on disconnect between higher education, real life

  

https://www.santarosa.edu/

Santa Rosa Junior College is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, the recognized local agency that is affiliated with the Federation of ... https://cte.santarosa.edu IN CALIF IS A TOP TOP J.C. SCHOOL CHECK ITS WEBSITE CTE.

Assemblymember Frazier: Career Technical Education

 Assemblymember Frazier: The Importance of Career Technical Education  

(Sacramento) - Assemblymember Jim Frazier (D-Discovery Bay) spoke passionately about the importance of career technical education (CTE) during a hearing on the future of CTE in California. Frazier benefited from CTE – previously called vocational education – when he was in California  

Sacramento) - Assemblymember Jim Frazier (D-Discovery Bay) 

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SELECT COMMITTEE ON CAREER  TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Deming High School's CTE Program Equips Students with Career

 The route for most students after high school includes attending a four-year university or community college.  But that’s not the only route. In Deming, some high school students are ready for the workforce right after graduation. Michael Hernandez reports.SHOW MORE
 

 

Thursday Moments from SkillsUSA's 2017 National Leadership and Skills Conference

 Here are some moments from Thursday's competitive action at SkillsUSA's 2017 National Leadership and Skills Conference: The SkillsUSA Championships! 

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Introduction to the Career Essentials Suite

SkillsUSA: Masonry

 Governor Bevin tries his hand at masonry during the National SkillsUSA competition, held in Louisville. 

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LINKED LEARNING PERKINS FIVE.

CALIF STATE CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION RESEARCH !

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CAIFORNIA:GAIN IN JOBS MODEST IN STATE: 04-20-19

DATA REFLECT AN ECONOMY THAT IS NEAR FULL EMPOYMENT.CONSTRUCTION LED THE WAY IN MARCH.

"EMPLOERS SHOULD CONSIDER FORGING STRONG PARTNERSHIPS WITH LOCAL TRADES AND COLLEGES TO BETTER SOURCE TALENT" SHE SAID GENINE WILSON A REGIONAL VICE PRSIDENT AT THE GIANT TEMP AGENCY KELLY SERVICES.

 https://enewspaper.latimes.com/desktop/latimes/default.aspx?pubid=50435180-e58e-48b5-8e0c-236bf740270e 


PACE OF HOME BUILDING SLOWS 04-20-19

WITH MATERIALS AND LABOR COAST RISING DEVELOPERS ARE WARY.


PLEASE NOTE IN THIS ARTICAL NO MENTION OF THE AGE POPULATION GRAPH AS TO HOW MANY IN PERCENTAGE ARE BABYBOOMERS WHICH IS CRITCAL FACTOR ,TO TRAIN IN REPLISHING A SKILLED WORK FORCE IN THE VERY NEAR FUTURE WHAT IS TIME FRAME,  WE HAVE JUST IN TIME !

Employers will do almost anything to find workers to fill jobs — except pay them more

JUL 10,2018

  “America’s labor shortage is approaching epidemic proportions,” reported CNBC, “and it could be employers who end up paying.” Well, yes. That’s how things are supposed to work: Businesses pay more to attract workers in a tighter, more competitive market for labor. 

87th Winter Meeting – United States Conference of Mayors

 The United States Conference of Mayors' 87th Winter Meeting took place ... mayors during the United States Conference of Mayors (USCM) 87th Annual [...] .... by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and former Vice President Joe Biden. 

Secretary DeVos delivers remarks at 87th annual United States Conference of Mayors Winter Meeting

 

Despite a booming economy with record-low unemployment, employer after employer reports that they cannot find enough qualified people to hire. I’m sure you’ve heard the same. There is a disconnect between education and the economy, just as there is often a disconnect between a child and the school they’re assigned to.

Too many students are unprepared for successful careers today, and beyond. And too many are treated more like commodities instead of as the individuals they are, each with unique abilities and aspirations.

As mayors, you have an important opportunity to build relationships between employers and educators. Today giant silos exist between educators and employers, between students and success. But students are better prepared for what comes next when their teachers learn from and partner with their community’s builders and doers.

In that vein, I was pleased this administration and Congress came together to pass what we call “Perkins V.” This new law is good news for those who want to break down those silos.

It gives states, districts, and community colleges more freedom to decide how to use taxpayer dollars to prepare students for success.

And as mayors, this year you have a critical role in helping your state shape its Perkins plan. For the first time, the law urges you and other local leaders to regularly evaluate student needs and how programs are meeting those needs.

Most of you likely work with your community’s economic development team. And most of you probably know the business leaders in your community well. And you certainly know your communities better than anyone in this town. You know what kinds of people are needed for the new businesses that are opening or expanding in your city. And you probably know a few folks who, with additional education, could thrive in some of those jobs.

You all want your communities to grow and prosper. So you must play the important role of bringing together education and industry. That demands a “rethink.”

And I’ve talked a lot about that lately. Some ask why that’s necessary. Well, education is the least disrupted “industry” in America. And, let’s not kid ourselves, it is an industry. The one-size-fits-all approach is a mismatch for too many kids. Every student is different and therefore learns differently. And education is too siloed. “Pre-K,” “K-12,” “CTE,” “community college,” “higher ed,” etcetera. The rest of the world, we know, is not siloed.

NEWS ARTICLES

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Secretary DeVos delivers remarks at 87th annual United States Conference of Mayors Winter Meeting

 Contact:   Press Office, (202) 401-1576, press@ed.gov

Thank you, Mayor Steve Benjamin, for that kind introduction.

It’s good to be back with some of you, and to meet so many more. I was active in local politics and policy for many years, so I know first-hand your leadership role is important to your communities and the people you serve.

I’ve always believed solutions are best developed by those closest to an issue – by states, by communities, and by families. And mayors have a unique role in those ecosystems.

In my current job, I naturally think a lot about all things education. Education is perhaps the most local issue there is. It starts with the family. And yet those closest to their own children and to local schools and teachers seem to be the least empowered. Yet parents know that they need different solutions for their different children. They know we need to rethink education.

We live in some of the most exciting and opportunity-filled times ever. Over the past 100 years, we’ve seen significant advances in technology, medicine, and travel – just to name a few. But through all these changes in our homes, in our workplaces, and in our communities, approaches to education have largely remained the same for too many American students.

Yet, right now, there are over seven million unfilled jobs in the United States. Last year when I was with some of you, there were six million. The demand for skilled workers has grown. And looking ahead, consider the reality that the majority of the jobs that today’s students will do just 10 short years from now haven’t been invented.

Despite a booming economy with record-low unemployment, employer after employer reports that they cannot find enough qualified people to hire. I’m sure you’ve heard the same. There is a disconnect between education and the economy, just as there is often a disconnect between a child and the school they’re assigned to.

Too many students are unprepared for successful careers today, and beyond. And too many are treated more like commodities instead of as the individuals they are, each with unique abilities and aspirations.

As mayors, you have an important opportunity to build relationships between employers and educators. Today giant silos exist between educators and employers, between students and success. But students are better prepared for what comes next when their teachers learn from and partner with their community’s builders and doers.

In that vein, I was pleased this administration and Congress came together to pass what we call “Perkins V.” This new law is good news for those who want to break down those silos.

It gives states, districts, and community colleges more freedom to decide how to use taxpayer dollars to prepare students for success.

And as mayors, this year you have a critical role in helping your state shape its Perkins plan. For the first time, the law urges you and other local leaders to regularly evaluate student needs and how programs are meeting those needs.

Texas lawmakers would make changes to CTE accountability

 

(Texas) School accountability would include student achievement in career technical education pathways under a bill moving through the Texas State Legislature.

Currently under the state’s A-F grading system, schools can only count students who have successfully completed a career certification program, but advocates note that such a system doesn’t account for the students who are making good progress toward earning a certificate.

HB 1388 would make changes to the state’s accountability system to allow schools to count students who have completed a sequence of CTE courses that add up to four or more credits that consisted of at least two courses in the same career cluster, including at least one advanced course.

“Student achievement in career and technical education currently is counted only when a student obtains an industry certification,” according to a staff analysis of arguments in support of the bill. “However, few industry certifications are available or attainable at the high school level. The bill would recognize the value of students beginning a course of study that could lead to an industry certification or other postsecondary credential.”

Although CTE was once considered a fallback option for students who were unlikely to continue their education or earn a college degree, the pathway has gained support throughout the country as a way to fill the need for skilled workers in various industries.

In some communities, efforts are being made at the local level to target specific needs. In Maine, for instance, high school-level firefighting programs were developed to help train and recruit young people for short staffed stations. And in states with large numbers of rural schools, including Nebraska, Idaho and South Dakota, lawmakers have increased funding to expand CTE and encouraged schools to partner with local industry leaders.

TRADES & TRAINING PROGRAM BUILDS BETTER FUTURES

 Courses helps educate youths needed to fill construction jobs as openings rise  

Mark Long came from a family of high school dropouts. And for a while, his siblings expected him to follow in their footsteps.

Math and science weren’t his thing.

“I just wanted to mess around,” the Orange County native said.

Then, Long discovered a new class at his high school.

Called BITA, or the Building Industry Technology Academy, the Katella High School course taught students how to hammer, saw, build walls and install wiring and plumbing. Students used their brains as well as their hands, with math as essential as a Milwaukee miter saw. 

It pretty much gave me a purpose,” Long, now 35, said of BITA. “Being able to build stuff was my passion.”

Long was the first in his family to pick up his high school diploma on graduation day and the only one to finish college.

Today, Long is a construction manager for a general contractor overseeing road and bridge work. And, he’s Exhibit No. 1 for how training programs like BITA can help solve the construction industry’s labor shortage by steering high school students into the building trades.

BITA is now a statewide program, with classes in 29 California high schools.

“Our goal is to get the kids … interested in the construction industry,” said Jill Herman, director of the BITA program, run by the California Homebuilding Foundation. “And hopefully get into the construction industry.”

Homebuilders see the labor shortage as their top problem this year, according to a recent National Association of Home Builders survey.

While the industry has added nearly 1.5 million new construction jobs since the recovery began, it’s been 300,000 workers short, on average, over the past 10 months, U.S. census and Labor Department figures show.

Demand for new homes is growing faster than developers can build them, industry officials say. Same with remodeling jobs.

“We’ve had a lot of people leave the industry. They’ve gone to other places [to find work] and they may never come back because of age, [or] they found a good job in … another skilled labor sector,” said Mark Pursell, president and CEO of NAHB’s National Housing Endowment. “It’s up to us to show the career path to the kids.”

‘We’re getting older’

The nation’s workforce as a whole has been aging, but construction workers are aging faster, census figures show.

The percentage of construction workers 45 and older went from a fourth of the industry’s workforce in 1993 to just under half in 2017. The number of senior carpenters, plumbers, masons and electricians tripled over that 25-year period, while the number under 45 years old increased just 16%.

“We’re getting older,” said David Pekel, CEO of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry. “We need to develop a way to market what the skilled trades mean as a career path.”

CWA Today is hosted by Bob Lanter, Executive Director at California Workforce Association

  

CWA Today addresses the workforce topics and issues that are important to you, the workforce professional. Episodes can be downloaded on a plethora of additional listening platforms; iTunes, Google Play, iHeart Radio, Sticher Radio or direct on Libsyn.com or scroll down to play our YouTube episodes.

CWA Today Wants To Hear From You!

Bob wants to hear from you, the listener. What workforce guests, innovations, or issues do you want to hear about next? Email: blanter@calworkforce.org and let him know, and he will address that topic in a future episode. 


15 Fast Facts about the Swiss Apprenticeship Program

 

This morning, the U.S. Departments of Education, Labor and Commerce joined the Swiss government in signing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on apprenticeships. This agreement will build upon ongoing collaboration between the United States and Switzerland to encourage businesses and stakeholders to promote the value of apprenticeship programs and develop effective strategies to increase awareness of and access to work-based learning.

While you may be familiar with apprenticeship programs in the United States, there is a lot to know about Switzerland’s programs. In recognition of this morning’s MOU signing, here are 15 fast facts about the Swiss Apprenticeship Program:

MAY 09, 2019 credentials not matching employer requirements

 

A mismatch between the goals of career technical education as established by the states and the needs of the labor market is at least partially the result of employers nationwide not signaling their needs and requirements to schools, according to a new study.

Part of the problem can also be attributed to the fact that about half of states don’t collect the data needed to tell whether their CTE credentials are aligned with what employers are seeking.

And in the 24 states that do collect the necessary data to measure if credentials earned in high schools meet local industry needs, researchers found that 10 of the top 15 credentials earned by students are already oversupplied in the job market.

The report was released Wednesday by Burning Glass Technologies–which specializes in job market analytics–and the Foundation for Excellence in Education–founded by former Florida Governor Jeb Bush in 2008 to advocate for innovation in education.

Matthew Sigelman, CEO of Burning Glass Technologies, said CTE programs are not failing to teach students the skills as intended. Rather, he said the study shows that the credentials provided through such programs often don’t support with what employers are actually looking for.

“The ultimate goal of any career credential, whether a certification, certificate, or license, is to give students an edge in the job market by demonstrating the skills they’ve acquired,” Sigelman said in a statement. “Every day employers signal what they’re looking for in their job postings. Ensuring that the supply of credentials is aligned with the demand by employers is fundamental to giving graduates a real chance in their careers.”

NEWS ARTICLES

CWA Today Podcast

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CWA Today is hosted by Bob Lanter, Executive Director at California Workforce Association and features interviews with experts on key workforce issues, both regionally and nationally, as well as workforce news and updates.

CWA Today addresses the workforce topics and issues that are important to you, the workforce professional. Episodes can be downloaded on a plethora of additional listening platforms; iTunes, Google Play, iHeart Radio, Sticher Radio or direct on Libsyn.com or scroll down to play our YouTube episodes.

CWA Today Wants To Hear From You!

Bob wants to hear from you, the listener. What workforce guests, innovations, or issues do you want to hear about next? Email: blanter@calworkforce.org and let him know, and he will address that topic in a future episode. 

New CEW report finds the manufacturing workforce is upskilling and downsizing

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 Dear Friends and Colleagues: 


In partnership with JPMorgan Chase & Co., we released new research that explores the changing manufacturing industry and its workforce from the period following World War II through today. Upskilling and Downsizing in American Manufacturing finds that workers with postsecondary education now outnumber workers with a high school diploma or less in the industry. 


The loss of nearly seven million manufacturing jobs since 1979 due to automation, globalization, and a more networked economy paralleled a shift in worker education requirements. Workers with a high school diploma or less declined from 79% of the manufacturing workforce in the 1970s to just 43% in 2016. Over the same period, the share of the manufacturing workforce with some college education but no degree grew to 26%, while the share of workers with bachelor’s degrees grew to 30%.


Nevertheless, for workers with less than a bachelor’s degree, manufacturing was still the largest provider of good jobs in 35 states in 2016, and it still provided 4.8 million of these jobs nationally. However, manufacturing is not expected to be a major job machine in the future, with employment expected to decline 2%—or by 253,000 net jobs—as of 2027.


CWA Today Podcast

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CWA Today is hosted by Bob Lanter, Executive Director at California Workforce Association and features interviews with experts on key  

CWA TODAY

E23: National Workforce Update with Chris Andresenworkforce issues, both regionally and nationally, as well as workforce news and updates.

CWA Today addresses the workforce topics and issues that are important to you, the workforce professional. Episodes can be downloaded on a plethora of additional listening platforms; iTunes, Google Play, iHeart Radio, Sticher Radio or direct on Libsyn.com or scroll down to play our YouTube episodes.

CWA Today Wants To Hear From You!

Bob wants to hear from you, the listener. What workforce guests, innovations, or issues do you want to hear about next? Email: blanter@calworkforce.org and let him know, and he will address that topic in a future episode. 

Orange County, California - OC Development Board

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 In Partnership with the Orange County Board of Supervisors, the OCDB oversees Orange County's workforce development activities and establishes programs ...

About OCDB · ‎Board Members · ‎About the County · ‎Workforce Innovation and ... Welcome to the website of the Orange County Development Board (OCDB). In Partnership with the Orange County Board of Supervisors, the OCDB oversees Orange County's workforce development activities and establishes programs in response to the workforce needs of Orange County, including labor market information, employment and training services, and business assistance. Central to the OCDB’s ability to provide services is the network of One-Stop Career Centers, satellite centers and youth employment and training programs located throughout the County. The OCDB designs and implements programs and services for businesses, adult job seekers, dislocated workers and young adults, working in close collaboration with education, business, labor, economic development and other organizations with a stake in preparing the County’s workers to contribute to our growing economy. 

Whitney High Broadcasting Program Named Best In The Nation

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OCKLIN (CBS13) — A high-school TV broadcasting program was named the best in the nation.

Their product is polished, their team is poised, and their news director and instructor couldn’t be more proud. 

“What it really comes down to though—as you look around this room—there are 32 of the hardest working students not only in Northern California but around the country,” said Ben Barnholdt.

The hard work has paid off big time, as Whitney High School’s broadcasting program was recently named the best in the nation.

The Rocklin school calls its station WCTV19. They cover the basics, including sports, but also dig deeper into meaningful topics.

“The issues that are going through–whether it’s mental health, whether it’s suicide prevention—we tackle those issues to make students aware of what’s going on not only in our school but in our community–that’s a big part of our program,” he said.

It’s a big achievement for the relatively new school that’s only been around for just over 10 years.

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CA STATE SB 972 2018 STARTS 07-01-19 SUCIDIDES CAMPAIN NEEDS MORE broadcast media program at Whitney High School, a public high school in Rocklin, CA, stands out as one of the most impressive and successful programs of its kind in the country. Using Telestream’s Wirecast live video streaming ...

 

Whitney High School Broadcast

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Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V)

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On July 31, 2018, President Trump signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) into law. The law reauthorizes and updates the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 to ensure career and technical education (CTE) programs meet the demands of the twenty-first-century economy. The new law includes several changes and additions relevant for educators, postsecondary institutions, employers, workforce development boards, community-based organizations, and others who serve historically underserved students in both secondary and postsecondary education.

To learn more about what the updated law means for CTE, view the resources below:

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Are your customers raving about you on social media? Share their great stories to help turn potential customers into loyal ones.

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Running a holiday sale or weekly special? Definitely promote it here to get customers excited about getting a sweet deal.

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