(714) 321-8238

ARTS/WRITING/THERAPY DOGS/RIDING BIKES BUILD MENTAL HEALTH MINUS SCREEN TIME IS THE KEY !!

Landscapes that Inspire: 2019 winners of the Washington County Youth Creative Writing Contest

image8

 

WASHINGTON CITY — Young writers and their families from all across Washington County gathered in Washington City’s Highland Park to celebrate their achievements as winners of a creative writing contest.

Over 240 students from 1st through 12 grades entered poetry or personal essays written on the theme “Landscapes that Inspire” in the 2019 Washington County Youth Creative Writing Contest. Winning writers wrote about landscapes ranging from Lake Louise in British Columbia to Snow Canyon State Park to their own backyards.

Contest organizers felt the park a fitting venue for the awards ceremony because of its sweeping views of local landscapes that inspire, including Red Cliffs Recreation Area, Sand Hollow, the Pine Valley Mountains and Zion’s West Temple and other monoliths.

Teen suicide and mental health: America's deadly, costly problems that have no end in sight

image9

 

McLEAN, Va. – The nation's medical system falls far short of meeting the demand for teen mental health services because cases of suicide and psychiatric disorders are skyrocketing, underscoring a public health crisis that is already costing Americans billions to combat. 

Research from federal regulators and medical groups shows the suicide rate for young people ages 10 to 19 rose by 56% from 2007 to 2016, the latest year for which figures are available. Only 40% of young people with major depression got treatment, according to the National Institute for Mental Health.

Severe depression is a common precursor to suicide,which kills thousands of children and teenagers a year in the USA.Suicides and suicide attempts cost the nation  about $70 billion a year in lifetime costs for medical care and lost work hours.

PRE-K STRIDER.COM

image10

GREAT COGNITIVE BUILDER

LEARNING INCREASE WITH DOGS TRAINED SEL !

image11

LETS BRING AWARENESS FOR THE BENEFITS HAVING SERVICES DOGS IN SCHOOL

image12

MANY RESEARCHERS HAVE PROVEN IN CLASSROOM ED SCORES INCREASE WITH SERVICE DOGS !!!

image13

WHY HAS THIS VITAL TOOL SERVICE DOGS BEEN MISSING IN EDUCATION WHEN OVER WHELMING PROOF IMPROVE SCORES/MENTAL SEL !!!!!!

Bringing therapy dogs into schools requires special handling

image14

 

  • While the use of therapy dogs at schools has been proven to offer benefits to students in terms of stress reduction and improved attendance and academic performance, school leaders also need to consider the needs of the animals themselves as they operate such initiatives, District Administration reports.
  • Because schools are active and complex environments, the person in charge of the pet therapy program at school needs to be someone who understands the stress levels that animals can handle and the risks involved in having them around children. Rather than adopting a school dog, administrators may be better off beginning by bringing in volunteers with trained dogs who use compassionate methods of training that encourage bonding.
  • These programs also work best when the goals are clear and the handlers, whether outside professionals or teachers, understand how to work with children who may be afraid or allergic to pets and how the animals can best be used to calm children and promote attendance and learning goals, the article says. Teacher also can benefit emotionally from the presence of therapy dogs on campus when the program is run efficiently.

Puppy love on campus helping kids cope with daily stress by Alisha Kirby

image15

 

(Calif.) Students stressed out over impending college acceptance and rejection letters drop by a teacher’s class to spend time brushing the therapy dog in her class just to calm their nerves.

At another campus, a first grader practices reading aloud while absentmindedly playing with the ears of a therapy dog that visits his class once a week.

Man’s best friend is playing an increasingly important role in maintaining student mental health as more becomes required of students to succeed academically.

Vicky Warren, a health teacher at Casa Roble high school in the San Juan Unified School District, has been bringing her golden retriever Cooper to class for the last five years. Warren said that having him in the classroom makes it feel more like home, which has helped lower student stress and made it easier to learn.

“He comes with me almost every day,” Warren said. “I've had students with anxiety and even Tourette Syndrome pet Cooper to feel calmer. Students come to my classroom at lunch, during passing periods, and a few stop by regularly for their daily interaction with Cooper.”

Warren said that some students credit Cooper as the only reason they show up to school some days.

“He is an integral part of my classroom and behavioral management, and I'm thrilled about the joy he brings to my students' day,” she said.

Every school 'needs dog as stress-buster'

image16

 

Every school should have a dog or another pet to reduce stress in the classroom, says Sir Anthony Seldon.

The University of Buckingham vice-chancellor says it is "a powerfully cost-effective way of helping children feel more secure at schools".

Sir Anthony was speaking at a conference about the need to improve young people's sense of wellbeing.

Education Secretary Damian Hinds says more schools seem to have "wellbeing dogs" and "the pets can really help".

'Perfect lives'

The University of Buckingham's Ultimate Wellbeing in Education Conference examined how to respond to the stresses and anxieties facing young people.

Mr Hinds told the conference that the relentless presence of social media made growing up "more pressurised".

He said this could be all-pervasive for teenagers, making them compare their own experiences with the "perfect lives" on social media.

It could also normalise exposure to harmful material on subjects like self-harm or eating disorders, he added.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School therapy dogs get recognition in yearbook

image17

 

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School therapy dogs get recognition in yearbook

HUMAN BOND CDC STUDIES OVER WHELMING MEDICALLY AIDS ONES HEALTH !!!

image18

Video “One year ago today, I announced Be Best, an awareness campaign dedicated to the children of this country and all over the world. Be Best has three pillars: the well-being of children, online safety, and opioid abuse."

 (7 May 2018) Melania Trump on Monday gave her multipronged effort to promote the well-being of children a minimalist new motto: "BE BEST."  The first lady formally launched her long-awaited initiative after more than a year of reading to  

When Netflix's 13 Reasons Why was released two years ago, depicting the life of a teenager who decided to take her own life, educators and psychologists warned the program could lead to copycat suicides. Now, a study funded by the National Institutes of Health shows that those concerns may have been warranted. https://www.npr.org/2019/04/30/718529255/teen-suicide-spiked-after-debut-of-netflixs-13-reasons-why-report-says

image19

Study: Youth suicides increased after release of ’13 Reasons Why’ on Netflix

 

A new study indicates that youth suicides spiked nationwide following the 2017 release of the controversial Netflix series “13 Reasons Why” about a girl who dies by suicide, leaving behind cassette tapes to explain the reasons she decided to end her life.

The study, led by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, says there were 195 more suicides than expected among youth ages 10 to 17 in the United States in the nine months after the show’s release on March 31, 2017.

Of those 195 suicides, 58 were in April 2017, said the study’s lead author, Jeff Bridge, who directs the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children’s.

That’s about 30 percent of the total, with the rest averaging about 17 suicides per month.

April 2017 also had the highest suicide rate among the age group in the five-year period analyzed (2013-2017), according to the study, accepted last week for publication by the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Bridge said data not included in the report indicate it was the highest rate in at least 19 years.

Related content

COMMON SENSE VIDEO

INSTAGRAM  SNAPCHAT-KIK-TWITTER TUMBLER -VINE-NETFLIX-PANDORA-SPORTIY--XBOX

Study: Youth suicides increased after release of ’13 Reasons Why’ on Netflix

 

A new study indicates that youth suicides spiked nationwide following the 2017 release of the controversial Netflix series “13 Reasons Why” about a girl who dies by suicide, leaving behind cassette tapes to explain the reasons she decided to end her life.

The study, led by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, says there were 195 more suicides than expected among youth ages 10 to 17 in the United States in the nine months after the show’s release on March 31, 2017.

Of those 195 suicides, 58 were in April 2017, said the study’s lead author, Jeff Bridge, who directs the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children’s.

That’s about 30 percent of the total, with the rest averaging about 17 suicides per month.

April 2017 also had the highest suicide rate among the age group in the five-year period analyzed (2013-2017), according to the study, accepted last week for publication by the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Bridge said data not included in the report indicate it was the highest rate in at least 19 years.

Related content

Best (practices) in show: Therapy dogs in schools

 Educators must focus on the comfort of students and the dogs to get best results 

 

Therapy dogs in schools can perform wonders: The animals relieve students’ stress, help kids learn to read, and even boost test scores and attendance.

To reach these goals, educators must focus as much on the animals’ needs as they do on the comfort of students, says Jennifer VonLintel, a counselor. Her golden retriever, Copper, serves as a therapy dog at B.F. Kitchen Elementary School in Colorado’s Thompson School District.

“Therapy dogs can do great things, but administrators need to have someone running the program who understands risk and stress levels for the dogs,” says VonLintel, who operates the website School Therapy Dogs. “A school can be a complex environment for a dog.”

Local USBE member votes against new state health education standards

 

The core standards are organized into the following strands:

  • Health foundations and protective factors of healthy self.
  • Mental and emotional health.
  • Safety and disease prevention.
  • Substance abuse prevention.
  • Nutrition.
  • Human development.

According to the state standards, they are meant to build off each other and allow students to enhance skills each grade year. In kindergarten, health education is meant to be an introduction to healthy behaviors. For middle and high school students, the focus lies more on establishing a healthy, safe lifestyle as well as emphasizing behaviors that resist unhealthy choices.

Diploma requirements still out of step with higher ed eligibility in most states

 

  • States are beginning to integrate career and technical education (CTE) and STEM-related courses into high school graduation requirements, and some are also revising diploma pathways to link coursework to postsecondary goals, but the updates fall short of ensuring credits earned make students eligible for admission to colleges and universities, according to a new paper from the Center for American Progress (CAP).
  • The paper is an update to a 2018 CAP report showing that high school courses and eligibility requirements at four-year public universities line up in only four states — Louisiana, Michigan, South Dakota and Tennessee. “States must do more than just tweak at the margins,” the authors write. “They should rethink how well their high school course sequence sets students up for success.”
  • CTE and other career-related opportunities can help students develop workplace skills, the authors write, but to be prepared for college, students should still take a course load that includes four years of English, two years of the same foreign language, and three years each of math (through algebra 2), lab science and social studies (including U.S. and world history).

NEWS ARTICLES HEALTH

image20

A major update relaxes screen time rules for some kids Kids over the age of six should have "consistent" limits on screen time, according to new guidelines from the American Academy for Pediatrics.

Screen time 'may harm toddlers' By Michelle Roberts

 Letting a toddler spend lots of time using screens may delay their development of skills such as language and sociability, according to a large Canadian study. The research, which 


tracked nearly 2,500 two-year-olds, is the latest piece of evidence in the debate about how much screen time is safe for kids. 

 

Letting a toddler spend lots of time using screens may delay their development of skills such as language and sociability, according to a large Canadian study.

The research, which tracked nearly 2,500 two-year-olds, is the latest piece of evidence in the debate about how much screen time is safe for kids.

In Canada and the US, experts say children should not use screens before they are at least 18 months old.

But UK guidelines set no such limit.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health says there is not enough evidence, even when you include this new study, for a "direct toxic effect".

What did the new research find?

Mums were surveyed (between 2011 and 2016) about screen use, and filled out questionnaires about their child's skills and development at ages two, three and five.

Screen time included watching TV programmes, films or videos, gaming, and using a computer, tablet, phone or any other screen-based device.

At the age of two, the children were clocking up around 17 hours of screen time per week.

This increased to around 25 hours a week by the age of three but dropped to around 11 hours a week at the age of five, when the children started primary school.

ADVERTISEMENT

The findings, published in the JAMA Paediatrics, suggest increased viewing begins before any delay in development can be seen, rather than children with poor developmental performance then going on to have more screen time.

But it is not clear whether screen time - including how much or what type - is directly to blame. Screen use might just go hand-in-hand with other things linked to delayed development, such as upbringing and how a child's remaining leisure time is spent.

What do the researchers think?

When young children are observing screens, they may be missing important opportunities to practise and master other important skills.

In theory, it could get in the way of social interactions and may limit how much time young children spend running, climbing and practising other physical skills - although they may still eventually catch up.

infant using a screen

Even without solid proof of harm, Dr Sheri Madigan and colleagues say it still makes sense to moderate children's screen time and make sure it doesn't interfere with "face-to-face interactions or family time".

They also said that, with hindsight, perhaps they should have followed the children from an even younger age because it is becoming increasingly common for 12-month-old babies to be watching and using screens.

How much is too much?

It is a good question, without a satisfactory answer.

The new study does not make any recommendation about how much is too much. Some of the two-year-olds were getting more than four hours a day or 28 hours a week of screen use, according to their mums.

The American Association of Paediatrics' (AAP) guidelines on screen time say:

  • For children younger than 18 months, avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting
  • Parents of children 18 to 24 months of age who want to introduce digital media should choose high-quality programming, and watch it with their children to help them understand what they are seeing
  • For children ages two to five years, limit screen use to one hour per day of high-quality programmes. Again, parents should be watching it with their children.
  • For children ages six and older, place consistent limits, making sure screen time does not get in the way of sleep and physical activity.

The Canadian Paediatric Society goes further, saying screen time for children younger than two is not recommended.

Bar chart showing rising internet use amongst all children 15 and under

The UK's Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) put out guidelines earlier this year, but sets no limit.

It says "evidence is weak for a threshold to guide children and parents to the appropriate level of screen time, and we are unable to recommend a cut-off for children's screen time overall".

Instead, it advises families to ask themselves:

  • Is screen time in your household controlled?
  • Does screen use interfere with what your family want to do?
  • Does screen use interfere with sleep?
  • Are you able to control snacking during screen time?

If a family can ask themselves these questions, and are satisfied with the answers, then they can be reassured that they are "likely to be doing as well as they can with this tricky issue", says the RCPCH.

Tips on cutting back

The AAP advises families to designate media-free times together, such as dinner or driving, as well as media-free locations at home, such as bedrooms.

The RCPCH says adults should consider their own use of screens and set a good example.

Most experts also advise that children are not exposed to screens for an hour before bed, so that their brains have time to wind down for sleep.

Screen time amongst 12-15 year olds: 99% go online, for nearly 21 hours a week; 91% watch TV, for nearly 14.5 hours a week; 83% have a smart phone; 77% play games, for around 12 hours a week; 74% have a social media profile

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: "We still need more research to tell us which children are most vulnerable to the harms of screen use and the impact it may have on a child's mental health.

"We also need to look at the effects of different content as there are also many positive ways of using screens."

Related Topics

Share this story About sharing

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites


GENERATION ONLINE

SEE ARTICLE TO PAGE A 9

MAY 2019 IS MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS MONTH

 In 2019, Mental Health America is expanding upon last year’s theme of #4Mind4Body and taking it to the next level, exploring the topics of animal companionship (including pets and support animals), spirituality, humor, work-life balance, and recreation and social connections as ways to boost mental health and general wellness. 

American Heart Association Urges Screen Time Limits for Youth

 

Time Limits for Youth

HealthDay News — The American Heart Association (AHA) is concerned about the impact screen time is having on sedentary behavior in children and teens, according to a scientific statement published online August 6 in Circulation.

Tracie A. Barnett, PhD, chair of the AHA Obesity Committee, and colleagues provided an updated perspective on sedentary behaviors specific to modern youth and their impact on cardiometabolic health and obesity. 

Related Articles

The committee writes that it is important to understand the context in which sedentary behaviors occur. There is also a need to more accurately capture the nature of sedentary behavior, both quantitatively and qualitatively, especially with respect to recreational screen-based devices. More evidence is required to better inform public health interventions and to establish detailed quantitative guidelines on specific sedentary behaviors in youth. While further evidence is generated, the committee suggests that televisions and other recreational screen-based devices be removed from bedrooms and meal times. Furthermore, daily device-free social interactions and outdoor play should be encouraged. Last, parents and guardians should devise and enforce screen time regulations and model healthy screen-based behaviors.

“Increasing trends of screen time are concerning; the portability of screen-based devices and abundant access to unlimited programming and online content may be leading to new patterns of consumption that are exposing youth to multiple pathways harmful to cardiometabolic health,” the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

TOPICS:

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE CHF AND ARRHYTHMIAS TECHNOLOGY

Recommended For You

Scroll down to see next articlePublish DateAugust 9, 2018

Cyber Insurance Recommended for All Physician Practices

HealthDay News — The growing threat of hacking is increasing the number of physicians buying cyber insurance, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

According to the article, cyber insurance covers losses and damages resulting from patient data being stolen, exposed, held for ransom, or improperly shared as a result of both deliberate actions (hacking or ransomware) and accidents, like a lost laptop or a coding error that accidentally exposes patient data. The covered consequences of a data breach can include paying fines and compensation for loss of income as well as the fees to hire information technology experts, a public relations firm, attorneys, and even a call center to handle patient inquiries. 

Related Articles

Practices that don’t have specific cyber insurance often have some limited coverage through their malpractice or general business policies. Brandon Clarke, co-founder of Affenix, a brokerage specializing in cyber insurance, says that a primary care practice with 5 physicians should have an umbrella cyber policy of at least $1 million, which could cost an estimated $1,200 to $5,000 a year.

“Even though you’re a small practice, the motivation to attack is still there. People who say they haven’t been targeted simply haven’t been targeted yet,” Lee Kim, director of privacy and security at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, said in the article.

Abstract/Full Text

TOPICS:

LAW PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY

Recommended For You

How Having A Dog Can Help Your Child Cope With Bullying

Bullying continues to be a problem in schools all over New Zealand. According to recent data, 26% of students said that they experienced at least one of six bullying behaviours several times a month over the previous year. The report also indicates that students are resorting to psychological or emotional bullying rather than outright physical violence, both of which can have a negative impact on a student’s sense of self. If you suspect that your child is being bullied, it’s important to find ways to empower him and build confidence which can help him to cope with bullying in a positive way. One way to do this is to have your child care for a dog, as having a pet can do wonders when a child is feeling lonely or isolated. Here’s how having a pet dog can help your child deal with bullying.

Having a pet can enhance your child’s social interaction
Dogs are wonderful conversation starters in children. Having a pet can help your child to interact with someone else who also has a pet as kids from different backgrounds can find common ground in their love of dogs. If your child befriends another pet owner like himself, encourage your little one to invite his new friend and pet dog to your home to play indoor games like fetch, hide-and-seek, and tag. As your child interacts more, he makes himself less of a target of school bullies as he opens himself up to new friendships.

Having a dog teaches your child how to have empathy and kindness
One way to cope with bullying in a positive way is to teach your child to empathise with the bully, as most bullies are also coping with personal problems and insecurities. Having a dog teaches your child to have empathy and kindness, even to those who are being mean to him. On the flip side, if you suspect that your child is the bully, having a pet dog can teach him to be kind to those who are smaller or more vulnerable than him.A dog can improve a bullied child’s mood
Bullying can result in your child developing feelings of loneliness or depression, but having a dog is one way to elevate your child’s mood and make him feel better. Just spending 15 to 30 minute splaying with a frisky pup can make your little one feel more relaxed and happier once he gets home from school.
Having a dog may not end the bullying, but it can certainly help your child cope with it. With your help and a pet’s help, your child can deal with bullying in a positive way.

Written By: Emma Mills, Health writer on HR issues and workplace bullying.
According to Emma: “Bullying is particularly concerning to me, given some of the problems my brother faced while he was at school, and I’m sure that sadly some of those issues have transferred into his adult relationships and confidence.” We hope this article along with the other previous articles would help someone – Let us know your views or comments…..

NO SCREEN TIME UNDER TWO ABOVE AGE OF TWO ONLY ONE HOUR !!

image26

Too Much Screen Time Can Have Lasting Consequences for Young Children’s Brains

 

Growing data suggests that exposing young children to too much time in front of a TV or computer can have negative effects on their development, including issues with memory, attention and language skills.

In the latest look at the topic, researchers report in JAMA Pediatrics that more screen time is linked to poorer progress on key developmental measures such as communication skills, problem solving and social interactions among young kids over time. Sheri Madigan, an assistant professor of psychology at University of Calgary in Canada, and her colleagues studied 2,441 mothers and children enrolled in the All Our Families study, which followed young children from ages two to five. Mothers reported on how much time their children spent in front of a television or computer screen on a typical day, and also reported on developmental measures by answering questions about their children’s communication skills, behavior and social interactions. The data were collected at the start of the study, when the children were two years old, then again when they were three and five. 

GURIAN SUMMER INSTITUTE 2019 - GURIAN INSTITUTE

 Dr. Glynetta Deshon Fletcher, June 23, Sunday Keynote, Part I: Trauma and ... What Participants Said About June 2018's Gurian Summer Training Institute:.


 

Dr. Michael Gurian, June 22,
Protecting the Emotional Lives of Boys and Girls, with a special section on the Digital Brain (screen time, social media, video games, and smartphones)

In this dynamic keynote presentation, Dr. Gurian will explore how the minds of boys and girls learn and grow, including brain differences that impact education and social emotional development throughout the lifespan.  He will provide insight into new genetic resources available to schools and families, the impact of environmental and cultural neuro-toxins on the learning brain, best teaching, parenting, counseling, and mentoring practices for both girls and boys, and safe, effective electronics and technology standards for various stages of child development.  

Michael’s presentation will include PET, SPECT, and MRI scans that display brain differences, and he will bring the latest research in both of his newest books, Saving Our Sons (2017) and The Minds of Girls (2018), focusing on educating, raising, and counseling boys, and educating, raising, and counseling girls.

Two primary topics will be social-emotional development tools for teachers, parents, and others, and successes and implications of the digital brain on education and parenting.  As he looks at the growing brain through the lens of gender science, he will explore themes on everyone’s mind today, including transgender questions and gender fluidity, what constitutes “toxic masculinity,” girl drama and relational aggression, girls and STEM learning, and brain-based boy-friendly learning strategies.

Michael will also lead two working lunch discussions.  The books that underlie these discussions are Saving Our Sons for Saturday and The Minds of Girls for Sunday.  We hope you will read these books ahead of time.  In these working lunches, we will study and strategize regarding violence/suicide prevention, and mental and emotional health in our school communities.


 

Dr. Glynetta Deshon Fletcher, June 23, Sunday Keynote, Part I: Trauma and Learning: Gender-Specific, Trauma-Informed Strategies for Helping Children Learn and Grow; Part II: Working Effectively with Children of Color in the Classroom and in Their World.

Dr. Fletcher is the Principal of Hamilton High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District and has 18 years of experience in education, from the middle school to university level.  She has worked in some of the nation’s most challenging environments.  A powerful speaker and social thinker, she is able to dig deeply into her subjects while remaining always practical and science-based.

She has always focused on the needs of children of color and a  number of years ago, she began to focus on trauma-informed classrooms (Adverse Childhood Experiences, ACE’s), as well.  This focus grew from the fact that she saw so many students on a daily basis who were dealing with trauma.  In Part I of her keynote, Dr. Fletcher will help teachers and others, including parents, to develop trauma sensitive classrooms and environments across the socioeconomic and school spectrum.  Dr. Fletcher will discuss the impact trauma has on teachers, students, and parents, and how traumatic situations keep the brain in fight/flight mode, causing children to struggle.  Participants will learn practical strategies for building strong relationships and attachments with traumatized children.

In Part II of her keynote, Dr. Fletcher will focus specifically on the learning and life-needs of children of color.  Issues of culture and conflict will be explored, including ways that boys of color escalate anger, and are not understood.  Dr. Fletcher will feature success strategies for helping these young men de-escalate after being involved in a conflict, and identify triggers that make things worse. As she provides examples from boys and girls of color themselves, she will provide multiple tools so that participants leave her two-part keynote with strategies they can use in their classrooms, hallways, neighborhoods, and homes immediately.

States seeing severe shortage for teen mental health services

 New reporting shows that the nation's medical system does not have enough resources to meet the demand for teen mental health services. Jayne O’Donnell, a healthcare policy reporter for USA Today who reported out this story, joins Hallie Jackson to discuss. NBC News and MSNBC are collaborating with USA Today this week to highlight the issues surrounding children and mental health. 

US has seen 33% increase in suicides since 1999

 Jayne O'Donnell Health Policy Reporter Jayne O'Donnell is a reporter, podcaster, author and TV contributor. She covers healthcare policy. 

AFSP raises awareness, funds scientific research and provides resources and aid to those affected by

 AFSP raises awareness, funds scientific research and provides resources and aid to those affected by suicide. Learn more about AFSP’s mission and history or select one of the items below to discover how we accomplish our work. 

What are Hope Squads?

 ​HOPE Squad is Alta High School's suicide prevention and peer support program that allows a group of student advisers to be the eyes and ears of our school. Alta's HOPE Squad works every month with students in their advisory class by utilizing activities and lessons on enhancing student health and safety. In addition, these students are trained to recognize suicidal ideation, as well as, be support for their peers. 
 

Video

FORMER U.S. SENATOR ORRIN HATCH TALKS ABOUT SUICIDE AND MENTIONS GREG HUDNALL.

MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS !!

HOPE SQUAD.COM

image27

 Greg Hudnall is the founder and Executive Director of HOPE4UTAH. He has championed suicide prevention in Utah schools and communities for over 20 years. His expertise is not only sought after locally, but also nationally at the highest levels of government.
Dr. Gregory A. Hudnall is a former high school principal, student service director and associate superintendent with the Provo City School District. He has been involved with suicide prevention for the past twenty years and has personally been involved with over twenty-five suicides as a first responder or consultant.
Dr. Hudnall has years of personal experience in working with suicide prevention. He has spent the last fifteen years as the executive director of a community crisis team responding to suicides, and is in his 16th year as chairman of the Utah Suicide Prevention Conference in partnership with Brigham Young University.
Dr. Hudnall was invited to testify before the United States Surgeon General on suicide in Utah and in 2013 was invited by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to present in Washington D.C. on the Circles4HOPE community mental health model at the “Dialogue on Behavior Health and Community Resilience in LDS Communities.”
In 2015 Dr. Hudnall was invited by the Whitehouse to participate in a webinar entitled strengthening the mental health of African American youth. 

Primary school-age pupils sharing sexual content in the classroom, teachers warn

image28

 One teacher reported 'explicit photos' circulated by pupils had resulted in a police intervention, after they ended up online 

 

Young children are sharing online pornography and sexual content in and outside of the classroom, teachers have warned, as calls are made to ensure young people are given proper lessons regarding the dangers of online.

In a survey of more than 1,500 teachers, around two thirds (62 per cent) said they were aware of pupils sharing inappropriate sexual content, with as many as one in six (16 per cent) of these children of primary school age.

Respondents expressed concerns over pupils using mobile phones to share the sexual content, as well as using them to post their own images online or send “threatening” and “homophobic bullying texts” to vulnerable students.

Britain's schools 'hit by sexting epidemic involving children as young as 12' Compulsory sex education introduced in schools to tackle sexting epidemic.

image29

 

Britain’s school children are experiencing a “sexting crisis”, according to a newspaper investigation.

Tens of thousands of children have been caught sharing sexual imagery online over the last three years, leading the Government and child-protection groups to call for compulsory sex education classes at schools.

The investigation, by The Times, included 50 schools and found that a third of all cases involved children aged 12 and 13. 

Senate Bill No. 972

image30

 Senate Bill No. 972CHAPTER 460
An act to amend the heading of Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 215) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 1 of Title 1 of, and to add Section 215.5 to, the Education Code, relating to pupil and student health.
[ Approved by Governor  September 17, 2018. Filed with Secretary of State  September 17, 2018. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

SB 972, Portantino. Pupil and student health: identification cards: suicide prevention hotline telephone numbers.Existing law, the California Suicide Prevention Act of 2000, authorizes the State Department of Health Care Services to establish and implement a suicide prevention, education, and gatekeeper program to reduce the severity, duration, and incidence of suicidal behaviors. The act authorizes the State Department of Health Care Services to contract with an outside agency to establish and implement a targeted public awareness and education campaign on suicide prevention and treatment, and requires that the target population include junior high and high school students.Existing law requires the governing board or body of a county office of education, school district, state special school, or charter school that serves pupils in grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to, before the beginning of the 2017–18 school year, adopt a policy on pupil suicide prevention, as specified, that specifically addresses the needs of high-risk groups. Existing law requires the Instructional Quality Commission to consider developing, and recommending for adoption by the State Board of Education, a distinct category on mental health instruction to educate pupils about all aspects of mental health, including, among other things, depression and suicidal thoughts and behaviors, as specified. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to send a notice to each middle school, junior high school, and high school that encourages each school to provide suicide prevention training to each school counselor, provides information on the availability of certain suicide prevention training curriculum, informs schools about certain suicide prevention training, and describes how a school might retain those services.This bill would require a public school, including a charter school, or a private school, that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, and that issues pupil identification cards to have printed on either side of the pupil identification cards the telephone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, and would authorize those schools to have printed on either side of the pupil identification cards the Crisis Text Line and a local suicide prevention hotline telephone number. The bill would require a public or private institution of higher education that issues student identification cards to have printed on either side of the student identification cards the telephone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, and would authorize the institution to have printed on either side of the student identification cards the Crisis Text Line, the campus police or security telephone number, or the local nonemergency telephone number, as provided, and a local suicide prevention hotline telephone number. The bill would require schools and public or private institutions of higher education subject to these requirements that have a supply of unissued, noncompliant identification cards as of January 1, 2019, to issue the noncompliant identification cards until that supply is depleted.

DIGEST KEY

Vote: majority  Appropriation: no  Fiscal Committee: no  Local Program: no 

BILL TEXT

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1.

 The heading of Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 215) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code is amended to read:

Article  2.5. Pupil and Student Suicide Prevention Policies

SEC. 2.

 Section 215.5 is added to the Education Code, to read:

215.5.

 (a) Commencing July 1, 2019, a public school, including a charter school, or a private school, that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, and that issues pupil identification cards shall have printed on either side of the pupil identification cards the telephone number described in paragraph (1) and may have printed on either side of the pupil identification cards the telephone numbers described in paragraphs (2) and (3):(1) The telephone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-8255.(2) The Crisis Text Line, which can be accessed by texting HOME to 741741.(3) A local suicide prevention hotline telephone number.(b) Commencing July 1, 2019, a public or private institution of higher education that issues student identification cards shall have printed on either side of the student identification cards the telephone number described in paragraph (1) and may have printed on either side of the student identification cards the telephone numbers described in paragraphs (2), (3), and (4):(1) The telephone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-8255.(2) The Crisis Text Line, which can be accessed by texting HOME to 741741.(3) The campus police or security telephone number or, if the campus does not have a campus police or security telephone number, the local nonemergency telephone number.(4) A local suicide prevention hotline telephone number.(c) Notwithstanding subdivisions (a) and (b), if, as of January 1, 2019, a school subject to the requirements of subdivision (a), or a public or private institution of higher education subject to the requirements of subdivision (b), has a supply of unissued pupil or student identification cards that do not comply with the requirements of subdivision (a) or (b), as applicable, the school or the public or private institution of higher education shall issue those pupil or student identification cards until that supply is depleted.(d) Subdivisions (a) and (b) shall apply for a pupil or student identification card issued for the first time to a pupil or student, and to a pupil or stude 

Teens, Social Media & Technology 2018

image31

 YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat are the most popular online platforms among teens. Fully 95% of teens have access to a smartphone, and 45% say they are online 'almost constantly' Until 

recently, Facebook had dominated the social media landscape among America’s youth – but it is no longer the most popular online platform among teens, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Today, roughly half (51%) of U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 say they use Facebook, notably lower than the shares who use YouTube, Instagram or Snapchat.

This shift in teens’ social media use is just one example of how the technology landscape for young people has evolved since the Center’s last survey of teens and technology use in 2014-2015. Most notably, smartphone ownership has become a nearly ubiquitous element of teen life: 95% of teens now report they have a smartphone or access to one. These mobile connections are in turn fueling more-persistent online activities: 45% of teens now say they are online on a near-constant basis.

The survey also finds there is no clear consensus among teens about the effect that social media has on the lives of young people today. Minorities of teens describe that effect as mostly positive (31%) or mostly negative (24%), but the largest share (45%) says that effect has been neither positive nor negative.

These are some of the main findings from the Center’s survey of U.S. teens conducted March 7-April 10, 2018. Throughout the report, “teens” refers to those ages 13 to 17.

A Majority of Teens Have Experienced Some Form of Cyberbullying

image32

 59% of U.S. teens have been bullied or harassed online, and a similar share says it's a major problem for people their age. At the same time, teens mostly think teachers, social media  

Name-calling and rumor-spreading have long been an unpleasant and challenging aspect of adolescent life. But the proliferation of smartphones and the rise of social media has transformed where, when and how bullying takes place. A new Pew Research Center survey finds that 59% of U.S. teens have personally experienced at least one of six types of abusive online behaviors.1

The most common type of harassment youth encounter online is name-calling. Some 42% of teens say they have been called offensive names online or via their cellphone. Additionally, about a third (32%) of teens say someone has spread false rumors about them on the internet, while smaller shares have had someone other than a parent constantly ask where they are, who they’re with or what they’re doing (21%) or have been the target of physical threats online (16%).

While texting and digital messaging are a central way teens build and maintain relationships, this level of connectivity may lead to potentially troubling and nonconsensual exchanges. One-quarter of teens say they have been sent explicit images they didn’t ask for, while 7% say someone has shared explicit images of them without their consent. These experiences are particularly concerning to parents. Fully 57% of parents of teens say they worry about their teen receiving or sending explicit images, including about one-quarter who say this worries them a lot, according to a separate Center survey of parents.

The vast majority of teens (90% in this case) believe online harassment is a problem that affects people their age, and 63% say this is a major problem. But majorities of young people think key groups, such as teachers, social media companies and politicians are failing at tackling this issue. By contrast, teens have a more positive assessment of the way parents are addressing cyberbullying.

These are some of the key findings from the Center’s surveys of 743 teens and 1,058 parents living in the U.S. conducted March 7 to April 10, 2018. Throughout the report, “teens” refers to those ages 13 to 17, and “parents of teens” are those who are the parent or guardian of someone in that age range.

Similar shares of boys and girls have been harassed online – but girls are more likely to be the targets of online rumor-spreading or nonconsensual explicit messages companies and politicians are failing at addressing this issue. 

NEWS ARTICLES

Q&A: How and why we studied teens and cyberbullying

image33

 

Roughly six-in-ten U.S. teens have been bullied or harassed online, according to a new Pew Research Center report that explores teens’ experiences with cyberbullying and their views about it. Senior Researcher Monica Anderson discusses the methods and meaning behind the data.

Bullying has been around for decades, centuries even. Cyberbullying is a newer manifestation of bullying. How did you define cyberbullying for this research?

We’re aware that cyberbullying can be a very nuanced issue. Our own research has shown that what might be harassment to one person might not be considered harassment by another. 

At the same time, other studies may use different measures to assess the prevalence of cyberbullying. For this project, we measured six specific incidents that teens might face online or on their cellphone: offensive name-calling, rumor-spreading, being sent explicit images without their consent, having explicit images of themselves shared without their consent, having someone other than a parent constantly asking where they are, what they’re doing or who they’re with, and physical threats. If a teen said they ever had one or more of those experiences, they were considered a target of cyberbullying.

Our definition was designed to show that these experiences can range from less severe forms of harassment – like name-calling that teens may shrug off – to more severe forms of online abuse that includes stalking or physical threats.

How Teens and Parents Navigate Screen Time and Device Distractions

image34

 54% of U.S. teens say they spend too much time on their cellphones, and two-thirds of parents express concern over their teen's screen time. But parents face their own challenges of  Amid roiling debates about the impact of screen time on teenagers, roughly half of those ages 13 to 17 are themselves worried they spend too much time on their cellphones. Some 52% of U.S. teens report taking steps to cut back on their mobile phone use, and similar shares have tried to limit their use of social media (57%) or video games (58%), a new Pew Research Center survey finds. device-related distraction 

Social Media Use in 2018

image35

  A majority of Americans use Facebook and YouTube, but young adults are especially heavy users of Snapchat and Instagram  

or 2019 survey data on social media and messaging app use, see “Share of U.S. adults using social media, including Facebook, is mostly unchanged since 2018.”

A new Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults finds that the social media landscape in early 2018 is defined by a mix of long-standing trends and newly emerging narratives.

Teens’ Social Media Habits and Experiences

 Teens credit social media for helping to build stronger friendships and exposing them to a more diverse world, but they express concern that these sites lead to drama and social pressure  

Amid growing concern over social media’s impact and influence on today’s youth, a new Pew Research Center survey of U.S. teens finds that many young people acknowledge the unique challenges – and benefits – of growing up in the digital age.

Today, social media use is nearly universal among teens.1 While notable shares say they at times feel overwhelmed by the drama on social media and pressure to construct only positive images of themselves, they simultaneously credit these online platforms with several positive outcomes – including strengthening friendships, exposing them to different viewpoints and helping people their age support causes they care about.

Social Media Fact Sheet

image36

 

MORE FACT SHEETS: INTERNET/BROADBAND | MOBILE TECHNOLOGY

Today around seven-in-ten Americans use social media to connect with one another, engage with news content, share information and entertain themselves. Explore the patterns and trends shaping the social media landscape over the past decade below.

Teenage depression and suicide are way up — and so is smartphone use

image37

 

Around 2012, something started going wrong in the lives of teens.

In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless — classic symptoms of depression — surged 33 percent in large national surveys. Teen suicide attempts increased 23 percent. Even more troubling, the number of 13-to-18-year-olds who committed suicide jumped 31 percent.

In a new paper published in Clinical Psychological Science, my colleagues and I found that the increases in depression, suicide attempts and suicide appeared among teens from every background: more privileged and less privileged, across all races and ethnicities, and in every region of the country. All told, our analysis found that the generation of teens I call "iGen" — those born after 1995 — is much more likely to experience mental-health issues than their millennial predecessors.

What happened so that so many more teens, in such a short time, would feel depressed, attempt suicide and commit suicide? After scouring several large surveys for clues, I found that all of the possibilities traced back to a major change in teens' lives: the sudden ascendance of the smartphone.

UNDERSTANDING MENTAL HEALTH/NEWS ARTICLES

The powerful prescription of pets

image38

 

Sure, you love your pet.  What may surprise you is how your pet loves you back.

A survey found 97 percent of physicians believe there are health benefits to having a pet, mental as well as physical. Check out this video — created in partnership with Mason Turner, MD, psychiatrist and director, Outpatient Mental Health and Addiction Medicine, Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California — about what powerful medicine our pets can provide.

Not ready to commit to a pet?  Humans are good for you, too.

Care for the whole you

image39

 Your mind and body are connected. You deserve care that supports your total health — mind, body, and spirit. If you struggle with depression, anxiety, addiction, or other mental or emotional issues that interfere with your daily life, we’re here to help. 

Student Youth Councils Empower Students to Use Their Voice

image40

 

Colorado youth program is building leadership skills and promoting community health

 

When Kaiser Permanente’s Arts Integrated Resources, based in Colorado, started youth engagement programs in 2007, the team wanted to develop young leaders who would serve as catalysts for change and as allies for Kaiser Permanente’s community health work.

These programs helped create a partnership in which young leaders and experts from schools, cities and state organizations are working side by side to create educational resources and pioneer programs that promote community health.

One of the many successful youth engagement programs is the Student Youth Advisory Council — a district-wide council made up of high school students who create health resources and design campaigns for students of the entire district.

Giving students a voice in community health advocacy

Student Youth Councils Empower Students to Use Their Voice

image41

 

Colorado youth program is building leadership skills and promoting community health

 

by Analeeza Sanchez, Communications Intern, Kaiser Permanente

“I think that when young people are involved in current, real-world situations, it enables us to passionately interact with the world and create a better future,” said Vanessa, a high school senior and Student Youth Advisory Council member.

When Kaiser Permanente’s Arts Integrated Resources, based in Colorado, started youth engagement programs in 2007, the team wanted to develop young leaders who would serve as catalysts for change and as allies for Kaiser Permanente’s community health work.

These programs helped create a partnership in which young leaders and experts from schools, cities and state organizations are working side by side to create educational resources and pioneer programs that promote community health.

One of the many successful youth engagement programs is the Student Youth Advisory Council — a district-wide council made up of high school students who create health resources and design campaigns for students of the entire district.

Giving students a voice in community health advocacy

Building a Resilient School Environment

image42

 

Safety protocols and active-shooter drills are becoming more and more common in today’s school environments. Sometimes, these drills can be emotionally tough or even triggering for students and staff.

McFadden Intermediate School in Santa Ana, California, has been part of a 2-year program focused on building a resilient school environment for students and staff at its campus. RISE — short for Resilience In Schools Environments — implements policies, practices and trainings to help the school students and staff adapt to and deal with challenges, trauma and emotionally charged experiences.

RISE is an initiative of Los Angeles Education Partners funded by Kaiser Permanente.

During the first year of the program, McFadden’s staff were trained to approach daily school life with greater sensitivity to trauma and its effects on social and emotional health. They worked at developing a community culture by coming together as colleagues to connect, learn and share. Together, they created a resource guide to support students and staff as they worked to build up resilience.

Making a positive impact with Safety Day

Health Resources to Create a Schoolwide Culture of Wellness

image43

 

A wellness strategy helps ensure the highest possible health, academic and school climate outcomes for everyone in a school — students, staff and teachers.

To support the idea of creating a culture of wellness, Kaiser Permanente partner School-Based Health Alliance fashioned an innovative resource to guide health advocates as they create, implement and sustain schoolwide wellness efforts.

The nationwide Hallways to Health project brought together 13 school-based health care programs to explore the potential of school-health partnerships by setting up collaborations, programs and policies that enabled students and school employees to thrive in the school environment.

Check out the new online toolkit with best practices, tools and case studies. Also, learn more about the Hallways to Health initiative.

Bringing hope to those affected by suicide !!

Bourdain, Spade's deaths shine light on soaring rates of suicide in US

image44

 Following a week of tragedy, in the suicide-deaths of Kate Spade and today, chef and journalist Anthony Bourdain, a conversation needs to be had. Dr. Gail Saltz, Psychiatrist and author, has an open conversation with Hallie on the topic of suicide, and what can help save a life: "Unfortunately, stigma keeps people from seeking treatment for themselves or a loved one," adding, "When it comes to suicide if you have any inkling, you really have to ask directly." 

CALIF SUICIDE FACTS & FIGURES 2019

image45

ON AVERAGE ONE PERSON DIES BY SUICIDE EVERY TWO HOURS IN THE STATE .2ND  LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH FOR AGES 15-34


WE RISE FESTIVAL OF WELL BEING NEWS VIDEO STORY

image46

PART ONE. PART TWO THEN PART THREE.

'Toxic stress' on children can harm their lifelong learning, mental and physical health

image47

 

The 10-year-old girl suffered from persistent asthma, but the cause was unclear. Tests ruled out everything from pet hair to cockroaches.

Then the girl's mother thought of a possible trigger. 

“Her asthma does seem to get worse whenever her dad punches a hole in the wall," she told Dr. Nadine Burke Harris. "Do you think that could be related?”

Harris, a San Francisco pediatrician, includes the example in her new book, "The Deepest Well," to show the connection between what's known as "toxic stress" and physical health.

Medical professionals and researchers have long studied the effect of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and lifelong mental health and addiction. Now awareness is growing of the link between childhood trauma on long-term physical health.

TEEN SUICIDES HIGHEST IN ORANGE COUNTY CALIF

image48

  

PLEASE LISTEN TO GGUSD BOARD MEETING AND PLAY THE BOARD AUDIO FROM THE PUBLIC COMMENTS PERIOD FROM THREE COMMUNITY MEMBERS SPEAKING ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH SUICIDES REGULAR BOARD MEETING AGENDA May 21, 2019 https://www.ggusd.us/media/2344/05-21-19.mp3 TIME LOCATION MARK UNDER PUBLIC COMMENTS ABOUT TEEN SUICIDES PLEASE LISTEN VERY FEW SPEAKERS STARTS AT MINUTES 23:23.

Orange County devotes $600,000 to first suicide-prevention program

Orange County Supervisor Lisa Bartlett speaks at a news conference about a new suicide prevention

 

The Orange County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to devote $600,000 to begin the first countywide suicide-prevention program aimed at combating a spiraling mental health crisis.

The Orange County Health Care Agency will direct the funds to the nonprofit MindOC, which will seek to increase awareness, provide resources to those in need, support existing programs and host educational community events to support those with mental health issues and their families. The program will largely focus on youth suicide.

“Youth suicide has become all too familiar,” board Chairwoman Lisa Bartlett said at a news conference following the meeting. “We now essentially have a public health crisis, and we need to take swift action.”

Directing Change encourages teens to create PSAs about mental health

Check out this great video

Video

 These short educational videos were developed in partnership with the National Alliance on Mental Illness California (NAMI CA). 

Video

SUICIDE PREVENTION 101

NEWS STORIES

Dr. Lisa Strohman joins Kim Komando to discuss sexting and its dangers

 

In this episode of Kim Komando’s podcast, Dr. Strohman discusses the threats and dangers of sexting, while sharing how can you keep your kids from being exposed to obscene material and sharing it with others.

Are teen drug sales on Snapchat, social media on the rise? Local law enforcement officers weigh in

 

ST. GEORGE For anyone who thought that maple leaf emoji was just a maple leaf – think again. It’s actually the universal code for marijuana, alongside a whole host of other emoji symbols used by teens to buy and sell drugs online.

Long gone are the days when the only source of drugs was a shady-looking character in an even shadier part of town. With the rise of social media and the internet, teens have access to a new generation of digital dealers who are little more than a click away.

According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, 95 percent of teens have access to a smartphone, and 45 percent say they are online “almost constantly.”

A study published in January by the National Institutes of Health reported more than three-quarters of those interviewed said they’d used Snapchat to buy drugs. Instagram was the next most popular, with around one in five saying they’d used it to arrange deals. WhatsApp, Kik and Wickr were all also frequently cited, with Tinder and Grindr also among the apps used to buy and sell drugs.

 

Child abuse is when a child is intentionally harmed by an adult or another child –

  Child abuse is when a child is intentionally harmed by an adult or another child – it can be over a period of time but can also be a one-off action. It can be physical, sexual or emotional and it can happen in person or online. It can also be a lack of love, care and attention – this is neglect. 

Promote current deals

Running a holiday sale or weekly special? Definitely promote it here to get customers excited about getting a sweet deal.

Share the big news

Have you opened a new location, redesigned your shop, or added a new product or service? Don't keep it to yourself, let folks know.

Display their FAQs

Customers have questions, you have answers. Display the most frequently asked questions, so everybody benefits.

Mental health and wellness — care for the mind, body, and spirit

Bike safety for cyclists of all ages

image50

 

Wearing a properly fitted helmet is important for every member of the family.

More children aged 5 –14 are seen in emergency rooms for bicycle-related injuries than any other sport. Head injuries are the most common result of a bike accident.

More than a half million people are injured every year in bicycle-related accidents, and many of those injuries may have been avoided if they were wearing a helmet.

“Properly fitted bicycle helmets are the single most important safety device for cyclists of all ages and are estimated to reduce head injury risk by as much as 85 percent,” says John Dunn, MD, a Kaiser Permanente Washington pediatrician. “Make it a rule that no one in your family cycles without a helmet, no matter how short the ride.”

Make sure the helmet fits properly and can be adjusted.

Most importantly, check to see if it fastens properly. A snug and secure fit is key.

Working on Wellness: Minigrant Helps Open Center for Teachers and Staff in Maryland

image51

 

A large part of Kaiser Permanente’s mission is to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. As part of that commitment, Kaiser Permanente recently helped open a wellness center for more than 70 teachers and employees at Carole Highlands Elementary School in Prince George’s County, Maryland. The new wellness center includes exercise equipment and a meditation area.

The teachers have named the lounge the WOW Center, which stands for Working On Wellness.

“Teaching is a very important job, but it can also be very stressful,” said Carole Highlands Elementary School principal JeVivvien Ray. “Everyone at our school would like to thank Kaiser Permanente for helping us create a space where we can relax and rejuvenate so that we can be the best we can be for all of our students.”

The WOW Center is made possible by Kaiser Permanente’s Thriving Schools Minigrant program, which has contributed more than $60,000 in grants to support teacher, administrator, and staff health in 25 Prince George’s County Public Schools during its first year.

Learnings From a Decade of HEAL Community Health Efforts

image52

 

Kaiser Permanente recently released results from 11 studies on community health initiatives that spanned more than 10 years. Two of the studies highlight key successes in improving health outcomes around physical activity and healthy lunches in schools.

Over the past decade, Kaiser Permanente used different aspects of its Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL) initiative to improve health policies, programs and ultimately health outcomes across more than 60 communities, positively impacting the health of more than 715,000 people.

What are the main takeaways from the studies involving schools? Results from the HEAL work are encouraging and can serve as a model for future work.

Changes in school food preparation methods result in healthier cafeteria lunches in elementary schools

This study examined the impacts of changes to districtwide food service and preparation in elementary school lunches.

READING TO ROVER: Does it really help children? Veterinary school says ‘yes’

image53

 

ds, dogs and a good book are a great combination, according to researchers in the School of Veterinary Medicine — and they have the data to back it up.

It has been recognized anecdotally that children become better readers when they regularly read aloud to dogs, and many animal organizations and libraries around the country have developed reading programs that pair up kids and dogs.

An example is the All Ears Reading Program, an animal-assisted therapy program developed by St. Louis Cardinals baseball manager Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation of Walnut Creek.

Hoping to collect scientific data related to the observed successes of reading-to-dogs programs, the foundation and the vet school decided to collaborate on two studies.

Share the big news

		
News Details
“Paws to Read" Library Summer Reading Program and OC Animal Care

OC Animal Care is

Have you opened a new location, redesigned your shop, or added a new product or service? Don't keep it to yourself, let folks know.

PAWS TO READ

image54

 Me-wow! Recent studies performed by research teams at U.C. Davis and Tufts University reveal dog-gone grrreatnews: Children who read aloud to therapy dogs or shelter cats on a regular basis demonstrate drastic improvement in their reading skills! Animals provide a safe, non-judgmental presence for struggling readers. Sharing books with furry supporters helps children to:

  • Sustain concentration and focus
  • Maintain a higher level of awareness
  • Improve attitudes toward school
  • Increase reading comprehension and fluency
  • Expand their use of vocabulary and language
  • Boost confidence and pride in their reading skills
  • Cultivate a higher motivation for reading and learning
  • Foster positive social interactions
  • Feel more comfortable about learning
  • Enjoy the experience of reading

 

BE YOUR BEST

Board of Supervisors Approves Countywide Suicide Prevention Initiative

image55

 Santa Ana, Calif. (March 13, 2018) – The Orange County Board of Supervisors announced that it has committed $600,000 of Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) Prevention and Early Intervention (PEI) monies for the creation of a countywide suicide prevention program. This funding will be given to MindOC, the fiscal entity of Be Well Orange County, an initiative bringing together public, private, academic and faith-based organizations, as well as others, to create a coordinated system of mental healthcare and support for all Orange County residents. 

How Colleges Today Are Supporting Student Mental Health

image56

 

Colleges and universities are addressing well-being in students with new and innovative approaches..

 

“Why are we ignoring our college students?” a frustrated colleague asked me last week. With so much focus on social-emotional learning, trauma-sensitive classrooms, and student well-being in K-12 schools, my friend argued passionately that young adults need our attention, too.

The challenge is clear. In 2018, researchers who surveyed almost 14,000 first-year college students (in eight countries) found that 35 percent struggled with a mental illness, particularly depression or anxiety. Here in the U.S., college students seeking mental health services report that anxiety is their #1 concern—and it is on the rise.

The World Health Organization officially recognizes workplace ‘burnout’ as an occupational phenomenon

image57

 POINTS

  • For the first time, the World Health Organization classifies workplace burnout as an occupational phenomenon. 

If you often feel exhausted or mentally distant at work, the World Health Organization may have a diagnosis for you: Burnout.

For the first time, the WHO has officially classified workplace burnout as an occupational phenomenon in its latest revision of the International Classification of Diseases. The agency previously defined burnout as a “state of vital exhaustion,” but this is the first time it’s being directly linked in its classification of diseases as a work hazard.

  • The WHO says it is a syndrome resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.
  • Burnout is not classified as a medical condition.

'GAMING DISORDER' OFFICIALLY RECOGNISED AS A DISEASE BY WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION

image58

 

Gaming disorder, which essentially means addiction to video games, has been officially recognised by the UN's World Health Organisation a modern disease.

The organisation in June 2018 decided to add gaming disorder addiction under its section of potentially harmful technology-related behaviors, including too much use of "the internet, computers, smartphones" and more.

Now, after a year and a half of deliberation on the new revision, all 194 member states of the WHO have agreed to adopt the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11), which included gaming disorder in its 2017 draft. The new revision goes into effect on 1 January 2022 

What's the WHO's definition of 'gaming disorder'?

The mention of gaming disorder sits in a subcategory in ICD-11 called "Disorders due to substance use or addictive behaviors" alongside alcoholism, gambling addiction, and, strangely, a section devoted to harmful cannabis use dependence.

The so-called, disorder has been described as "a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behavior, which may be online or offline, manifested by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences."

WHO's classification of gaming addiction as a disease: Industry calls for a re-examination

The global video game industry which includes representatives from across Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea, South Africa, and Brazil have called on the WHO member states to rethink their decision.

Video game addiction is a mental health disorder, World Health Organization says

image59

 The WHO calls gaming addiction "a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behavior" so severe it "takes precedence over other life interests".  

LONDON, June 18 - Many parents already have concerns, but some may now have a new argument for limiting their children's 'screen time' — addiction to video games has been recognized by World Health Organization (WHO) as a mental health disorder.

The WHO's International Classification of Diseases (ICD), a reference bible of recognized and diagnosable diseases, describes addiction to digital and video gaming as "a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behavior" that becomes so extensive it "takes precedence over other life interests".

The WHO's expert on mental health and substance abuse, Shekhar Saxena, said some of the worst cases seen in global research were of gamers playing for up to 20 hours a day, forgoing sleep, meals, work or school and other daily activities.

He stressed that only a small minority of people who play digital and video games would develop a problem, but said recognition of early warning signs may help prevent it.

"This is an occasional or transitory behavior," he said, adding that only if such behavior persists for around a year could a potential diagnosis of a disorder be made.

Responding to the decision to including gaming addiction, the Video Games Coalition — an industry lobby group — said their products were "enjoyed safely and sensibly by more than 2 billion people worldwide" across all kinds of genres, devices and platforms.

It added that the "educational, therapeutic, and recreational value" of games was well-founded and widely recognized and urged the WHO to reconsider.

The ICD, which has been updated over the past 10 years, covers 55,000 injuries, diseases and causes of death. It forms a basis for the WHO and other experts to see and respond to trends in health.

Recommended

"It enables us to understand so much about what makes people get sick and die, and to take action to prevent suffering and save lives," WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement as the ICD was published.

The ICD is also used by health insurers whose reimbursements depend on ICD classifications.

This latest version — known as ICD-11 — is completely electronic for the first time, in an effort to make it more accessible to doctors and other health workers around the world.

ICD-11 also includes changes to sexual health classifications. Previous editions had categorized sexual dysfunction and gender incongruence, for example, under mental health conditions, while in ICD-11 these move to the sexual health section. The latest edition also has a new chapter on traditional medicine.

The updated ICD is scheduled to be presented to WHO member states at their annual World Health Assembly in May 2019 for adoption in January 2022, the WHO said in a statement.


Display their FAQs

image60

Customers have questions, you have answers. Display the most frequently asked questions, so everybody benefits.

Suicide Prevention - Kevin's Story

 
LA County Dept of Mental Health / LACDMHPublished on Sep 11, 2017SUBSCRIBE 446Kevin Hines attempted suicide by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. He survived, this is his story.   If you or a loved one is struggling with thoughts of suicide, seek help by contacting National Suicide Prevention Lifeline '1-800-273-TALK (8255)' or visiting their site at http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org. Their assistance is free, confidential and available 24/7.  The video is a part of suicide prevention