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 Back-to-School: "Unplug: Raising Kids in a Technology Addicted World" 


 Licensed Clinical Psychologist Dr. Lisa K. Strohman wrote the book on the topic, "Unplug: Raising Kids in a Technology Addicted World," and is the Founder and CEO of the technology wellness center. As kids head back to class and start tackling homework again, will they need to  

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Your Kids Brain On Tech | Dr. Lisa Strohman | Eagle River Youth Coalition & Vail Health

 Children are experiencing increased depression and behavioral health issues at an alarming rate. To educate the community in Eagle County, Colorado, Eagle River Youth Coalition and Vail Health brought in Dr. Lisa Strohman, a clinical psychologist, co-author of Unplug and founder of The Digital Citizen Academy. Presented at Battle Mountain High School in Edwards, Colorado, on Oct. 2, 2018.SHOW MORE
 

Founder of Digital Citizen Academy Dr. Lisa Strohman

 Founder of Digital Citizen Academy Dr. Lisa Strohman joins KABC's McIntyre in the Morning to discuss technology addiction, the dangers of early exposure, and ways parents can raise their "digital citizen" children. 

is technology drawing your family together or driving it apart?

Growing Up Social: Raising Relational Kids in a Screen-Driven World

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In this digital age, children are spending more and more time interacting with a screen and less time playing outside, reading a book, or interacting with a parent. While technology can benefit us, it can also erode a sense of togetherness and hinder a child's emotional and social development.

 

How to Reconnect our Digitally Distracted Kids

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by guest author, Tom Kersting, licensed psychotherapist and author of Disconnected

The next time you go out to eat all you have to do is take a look around the restaurant. You will see that nearly every child in the restaurant is staring at a smartphone or tablet, often for the entire length of their stay. And in most cases, so are the parents. This is only one example of how families are being distanced from one another. Furthermore, few families have meals together at home on a regular basis and for those that do, many of them are using electronics simultaneously.  All of the research shows that children who have dinner together with family most nights of the week, have stronger mental and emotional health, do better in school and have better interpersonal relationships. They will also be less likely to become drug addicts and less likely to become sexually involved at an early age.

I often tell audience members at my lectures that I would love to put hidden cameras in homes across America because it would document for us how families no longer function as families. A better description would be four individual’s living under the same roof all connected to some kind of screen and disconnected from each other.  The next time you attend one of your child’s sporting events, look around, and see how many parents are actually watching the game. You will notice many of them, not all, chronically checking their phones and missing their child perform. Ultimately, they are ‘missing the moment’.  We need to be better examples for our children. We need to set rules for them and for ourselves. And, we need to communicate with them in a real way, a lot.

Here are 5 tips to help you reconnect with your children, as well as your spouse.

  1. When you and your family are together make sure you spend more time disconnected from your devices than you do connected to them. It’s as simple as that.
  2. Leave your phone in your car when you are attending your children’s sporting events. If you feel anxious or ‘naked’ without your phone, that is a sign that you’re addicted to it.
  3. Leave the devices in your car when you are out to dinner with your family. How can you possibly expect to develop strong relationships with your children or spouse if you or your children are staring at a screen the entire time?
  4. Get your pre-teen or teen out of their bedroom and into the family room. Too many kids today spend way too much time isolated in their bedrooms away from the rest of the family because they are too busy using social media or playing video games. Bedrooms are called bedrooms for a reason and family rooms are called family rooms for a reason. Get your kids reconnected to you and disconnected from cyberspace.
  5. Do family activities together. I don’t care if it’s pulling weeds or shooting hoops together. Interaction is part of our hard-wiring as humans.

Are you concerned that screens are disconnecting your family?  

Don’t miss the RECONNECT Event in Charlotte, NC on Thursday, August 31, 2017 7-9 pm at CPCC sponsored by FamiliesManagingMedia. Nationally acclaimed speaker, author, and psychologist, Thomas Kersting, will explore the mental and emotional effects of screens on teens. You will leave with strategies to help your child thrive in the real world balancing screen habits and healthy relationships. Parents and teens are welcome. Get your tickets today! www.reconnectevent.com

Is technology drawing your family together or driving it apart?

Is technology drawing your family together or driving it apart?

 In this digital age, children are spending more and more time interacting with a screen and less time playing outside, reading a book, or interacting with a parent. While technology can benefit us, it can also erode a sense of togetherness and hinder a child’s emotional and social development.

In Growing Up Social, Gary Chapman and Arlene Pellicane will empower you with the tools you need to make positive changes . . . starting today. Through stories, wit, and wisdom, you’ll discover how to take back your home from an overdependence on screens. Plus, you’ll learn to teach the five A+ skills that every child needs to master: affection, appreciation, anger management, apology, and attention.

Learn how to:

  • Replace mindless screen time with meaningful family time
  • Establish simple boundaries that make a huge difference
  • Discover what's working for families that have become screen savvy
  • Equip your child to be relationally rich in a digital world
  • Learn healthy ways to occupy your child while you get things done

Now is the time to equip your child with a healthy involvement with screens and a

Disconnected: How To Reconnect Our Digitally Distracted Kids

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 Tom Kersting is a nationally renowned psychotherapist, and school counselor. He appears regularly on the most popular talk shows and news shows and has hosted television series’ and shows for A&E Network, National Geographic Channel, Food Network and Oprah’s Wellness Network.  

5.0 out of 5 starsRemove the smartphones from kids, immediately. Share this book with all your parent friends.

January 18, 2018

Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase

School Counselor and private therapist Thomas Kersting is highlighting a major problem in our society. As I read through this book, I SAW my 14 year old daughter over and over again. I hate to admit it, but I'm one of the parents he was speaking to in the book...I caved in to the peer pressure and allowed my 12 year old daughter to have a smartphone. I will advocate fully that I was wrong to do so and am now backpedaling hard. Kersting has taken his own experiential evidence of the higher influx of mental issues and problems amongst his school children, compared it with other school counselors, and then started digging into studies and research correlating the information in a clear way. Take his observations and look around you. Remove the smartphone from the kids, and limit their screen time NOW. Share this book with every parent you know and take a stand. 

Biography

Tom Kersting is a psychotherapist and school counselor, and is a contributor for Fox News. He was the co-host of two A&E Network television series, "Surviving Marriage" and "Monster In-Laws". Tom appears regularly on popular talk shows and news shows providing insight and advice about parenting, family, education and wellness. 

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Three Risks of Too Much Screen Time for Teens

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You probably know that technology overuse may be damaging. But do you know why?


 We understand that smartphone and social media overuse can be toxic for teens (and, frankly, for all of us). But do we understand why? When we know what it is about smartphones and social media that may be hurtful, we can better help our teens use their devices in healthy, nonharmful ways. 


  So why can overuse be toxic? The reasons are many, but research reveals three things that might surprise you. 

Is your child addicted to tech? Too much screen time can lead to later addictions

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If you have little kids attached to tablets, that system in their brain that's getting rewarded over and over again can definitely lead to later life addictions.

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The Impact of Technology on Adolescent Brains

Kids and technology, giving up the gadgets

 Dr. Lisa Strohman, founder and director of Digital Citizen Academy talked about signs to look for to see if your kids are getting too much technology. 

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Apps Kids Are That Using Parents Need to Know About

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Empowering Kids to Rise Above Technology Addiction | Lisa Strohman | TEDxPasadena

SCREEN TIME CAN BE HURTFULL,HARMFUL,HURTFUL, IF NOT USED SAFELY ! MORE SOCIAL CONNECTION !!!

Is Screen Time Toxic for Teenagers?

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Screen time is a likely cause of the ongoing surge in teen depression, anxiety, and suicide.

Some days, I can see how profoundly anti-social technology makes my family, adults and teens alike. We joke that our kids get “screen stoned”—spacey and despondent, or irritable and aggressive. We may laugh, but it isn’t that funny. I know what all that screen stimulation is doing to my teenagers’ brains, and it’s concerning.

I know I’m not alone in worrying; half of parents surveyed in 2018 said that they were concerned that their “child’s mobile device use is negatively affecting his or her mental health,” and nearly half thought their child was addicted to the device.

As seen in Time, USA TODAY, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and on CBS This Morning, BBC, PBS

As seen in Time, USA TODAY, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and on CBS This Morning, BBC, PBS

  

iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of 

Increases in Depressive Symptoms, Suicide-Related Outcomes, and Suicide Rates Among U.S. Adolescents

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Increases in Depressive Symptoms, Suicide-Related Outcomes, and Suicide Rates Among U.S. Adolescents After 2010 and Links to Increased New Media Screen Time

Is Screen Time Bad for Kids’ Brains?

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 A study featured on “60 Minutes” is sure to alarm parents. Here’s what scientists know, and don’t know, about the link between screens, behavior, and development.  A $300 million research project is studying 11,800 children through adolescence to see how drug and alcohol use, concussions, and screen time may affect brain development. 

How to take a break from your phone, email, and work

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Being constantly connected to our work and smartphones makes us feel vaguely stressed and anxious. It prevents us from focusing and thinking deeply, and from spending time on the things that bring us lasting joy. It’s good to take a break.

But taking a break can be hard to do, because our smartphones and social media and email are designed to be addicting. (If you think you aren’t addicted, I challenge you to take this quiz.) It doesn’t work for most people to just will themselves not to check their phones or their email.1 Below are a few strategies to put some distance between yourself and the things that are stealing your attention.

Is Screen Time Toxic for Teenagers?

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Screen time is a likely cause of the ongoing surge in teen depression, anxiety, and suicide.

Newsmaker Sunday: Dr. Lisa Strohman

 FOX 10's John Hook talks to Dr. Lisa Strohman, a former FBI profiler who now runs Digital Citizen Academy, an organization that addresses the global issue of technology addiction and overuse. Online: https://digitalcitizenacademy.org 

Video: We are defined by how well we love each other, by how well we truly see one another.

 

Raising Kids in a Technology Addicted World with Dr. Lisa Strohman


 Dr. Lisa Strohman, Founder of Technology Wellness Center and Digital Citizen Academy, joins Hallmark Channel's Home&Family to discuss technology overuse and addiction in young children and teens and offers advice to parents. 

Video

 Dr. Lisa Strohman joins HLN to discuss the dangers associated with smart phones and young adults. 

SMART DEVISE HAS NOW BEEN IDENTIFIED IN NEW MEDICAL RESEARCH TO HAVE A LONG TERM EFFECTS IN DELAYING DEVELOPMENTAL PROCESS OF EDUCATION. LIMIT TIME IS THE KEY !!!!

Is your child addicted to tech? Too much screen time can lead to later addictions

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If you have little kids -- 4- 5- and 6-year-olds -- attached to tablets, that system in their brain that's getting rewarded over and over again can definitely lead to later life addictions

“That scares me,” Mesa mom Rachel Auer said.

She said her kids, ages 3 and 4, use their tablets every day. It’s not at all unusual for families today.

“It’s a pretty big part of their lives,” she said. “Most of the time they use it when mommy need a break.”

She often uses that “break” to tackle household chores.

“When I first started using electronics, I thought it was absolutely awesome because I got a lot done,” she explained. “But then what I would find, [with] my little guy especially, he would cry a lot if he got it taken away or if he wasn't able to use it when we were using it.”

Clinical psychologist and tech wellness expert Dr. Lisa Strohmansays that’s a red flag. A big one.

The Digital Citizen Academy Diversion Program

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Dr. Lisa Strohman, psychologist, attorney, author, and mother established Digital Citizen Academy to help keep families safe from online dangers. Her background working as a visiting scholar with the profiling unit at the FBI during one of the most tragic school shootings in the US helped create her passion to help proactively prevent and educate students, educators and parents on issues related to technology. Read more…

Current Clients
 

GRAY MATTER VOLUME FROM THE EFFECTS FROM SCREEN TIME

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 Jul 24, 2018 - A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is a common procedure around the world.MRI uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues within the body. ... This article looks specifically at MRI scans, how they work, and how doctors use  

Does Screen Time Affect Development Delays in Young Kids?

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Valid for credit through: 3/1/2020

Clinical Context

Developmental deficits and delays in language, communication, motor skills, and/or socioemotional health affect 1 in 4 children entering school. Without intervention, these gaps in development tend to widen over time, resulting in a burden on education and health systems requiring greater government and public expenditures for remediation and special education. Approximately 98% of US children age 8 years or younger live in an Internet-connected home and, on average, have more than 2 hours' screen time daily, exceeding the pediatric guideline recommendation that children spend no more than one hour per day viewing high-quality programming.

Although excessive screen time in children has been associated with developmental delays, it is unclear if greater screen time leads to worse performance scores on developmental screening tests or if children with poor developmental performance are given more screen time to help control their challenging behavior. The goal of this longitudinal cohort study by Madigan and colleagues was to examine the directional association between screen time and child development in a population of mothers and children in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Study Synopsis and Perspective

Helping parents keep their children safe online

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What age specific advice is available for my child? 

Whatever their age, we can help you to find out more about what your children might be doing online and give you some simple, practical and easy advice on the steps you can take as a parent to keep them as safe as possible.

 

What issues could be affecting your children?

Get to grips with what they may come across on the internet and how to get help if you need it.

Find out what to do if you’re worried about anything you or your child has seen online.

 

Online safety advice to help children manage digital challenges

Display their FAQs

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Customers have questions, you have answers. Display the most frequently asked questions, so everybody benefits.

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Safeguarding children online is top priority as UK set to introduce new online safety standards

 

The UK Government is set to introduce new measures to ensure that the UK is the safest place in the world to be online.  The range of proposed measures hopes to encourage companies to take reasonable steps to keep their users safe and tackle illegal and harmful activity on their services.

Digital Citizen Academy

 Digital Citizen Academy is dedicated to improving the lives of students, parents and educators and to providing eresources, tools and knowledge needed to foster a healthy balance with technology. Our research-based education, prevention and diversion programs are professionally designed to inform, protect and support young children, teenagers and adults impacted by issues resulting from technology use and overuse. Programs are designed with age appropriate content and provide trackable and measurable data for school districts and organizations. 

FEATURES OF THE DCA HOME PROGRAM

 DCA has developed an online program for the home that provides tools and resources to support families and help them address the specific issues their children will face throughout their school years when using technology. Content is updated frequently and designed to help families navigate the challenges and protect their children from the pitfalls and dangers of online activities. 

SWITCH OFF Government urges parents to limit their children’s social media use to TWO hours at a tim

 SWITCH OFF 

Government urges parents to limit their children’s social media use to TWO hours at a time

Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies's formal guidelines come after content promoting suicide and self-harm was linked to death of Molly Russell, 14

EXCLUSIVEBy Steve Hawkes, Deputy Political Editor1st February 2019, 9:19 pmUpdated: 3rd February 2019, 12:09 am  

CHILDREN should be limited to just two hours-a-time on social media – new official advice will declare next week.

In the first formal guidelines ever, the Chief Medical Officer will pile huge pressure on web giants to introduce a cut-off for under-18s.

UNIFORM 'BATTLES BULLIES' Education Secretary backs schools that enforce a restrict uniform policy

 

Damian Hinds told a global education conference uniform rules were an 'important leveller'

By Lynn Davidson, Whitehall Correspondent22nd January 2019, 12:46 amUpdated: 22nd January 2019, 12:46 am  

THE Education Secretary yesterday backed schools that enforce a strict uniform policy to stop pupils who don’t have expensive trainers or gear being bullied.

Damian Hinds told a global education conference uniform rules were an “important leveller” to stop “footwear competitiveness” for less advantaged pupils.

 Education Secretary Damian Hinds backs schools that enforce a strict uniform policy to prevent bullying

He was questioned whether strict policies should be in place to help poor children who go to school to find their classmates wearing designer shoes or coats.

Mr Hinds said: “Uniform itself is an important leveller and I think does play a really important role in that sense.

“Schools of course can, and in some cases do, have rules to make sure that you don’t get some of the kind of ‘footwear competitiveness’ - more likely to be trainers I think, than black school shoes.

“Whatever policy a school individually sets, I think for someone in my role the most important thing is to support them whenever they are doing that in a reasonable way.”

He added: “Making sure that teachers are fully supported is absolutely vital.

 

World health officials take a hard line on screen time for kids. Will busy parents comply?

SCREEN TIME WITH SOCIAL MEDIA IS NOW INTERNATIONAL ISSUES !!

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What does screen time do to toddler brains?

 

Is too much screen time linked to poor performance on developmental screening tests? A recent study confirms what many parents have long feared.

Spending a lot of time staring at screens as a toddler is linked with poorer performance on developmental screening tests later in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics on Monday.

Too Much Screen Time Can Have Lasting Consequences for Young Children’s Brains

 

Growing data suggests that exposing young children to too much time in front of a TV or computer can have negative effects on their development, including issues with memory, attention and language skills.

In the latest look at the topic, researchers report in JAMA Pediatrics that more screen time is linked to poorer progress on key developmental measures such as communication skills, problem solving and social interactions among young kids over time.

Sheri Madigan, an assistant professor of psychology at University of Calgary in Canada, and her colleagues studied 2,441 mothers and children enrolled in the All Our Families study, which followed young children from ages two to five. Mothers reported on how much time their children spent in front of a television or computer screen on a typical day, and also reported on developmental measures by answering questions about their children’s communication skills, behavior and social interactions. The data were collected at the start of the study, when the children were two years old, then again when they were three and five.

Many studies have looked at the connection between screen time and developmental issues at one point in time, but by following the children over many years, Madigan and her team could learn more about how screen time and development interact. For example, while some studies suggested that increased screen time might contribute to slower development, it was also possible that parents with children with behavioral issues and developmental delays might be more likely to use movies, TV or video games to calm or quiet their child.

What does screen time do to toddler brains?

 

Is too much screen time linked to poor performance on developmental screening tests? A recent study confirms what many parents have long feared.

Spending a lot of time staring at screens as a toddler is linked with poorer performance on developmental screening tests later in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics on Monday.


 

development of 2,441 children and found that higher levels of screen time at ages 2 and 3 can impact development at 3 and 5. Development includes growth in communication, motor skills, problem-solving and social skills. Signs of such development can be seen in behaviors like being able to stack a small block or toy on top of another one.

“This study shows that, when used in excess, screen time can have consequences for children’s development. Parents can think of screens like they do giving junk food to their kids: In small doses, it’s OK, but in excess, it has consequences,” Sheri Madigan, an assistant professor and research chair in determinants of child development at the University of Calgary, who was lead author of the study, told CNN.

Screen Time Linked to Poorer Child Developmental Performance

 

HealthDay News — Screen time is associated with poorer performance on developmental screening tests among young children, according to a study published online January 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Sheri Madigan, PhD, from the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, and colleagues examined the directional association between screen time and child development in a three-wave cross-lagged panel model. Data were included for 2441 mothers and children and were available when children were aged 24, 36, and 60 months. Developmental outcomes were assessed via maternal report using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, Third Edition.

The researchers observed significant correlations for higher levels of screen time at ages 24 and 36 months with poorer performance on developmental screening tests at 36 and 60 months, respectively (β, −0.08 and −0.06, respectively). An association between lower scores on developmental screening tests and higher levels of screen time at later time points was not observed. 

Related Articles

“To our knowledge, the present study is the first to provide evidence of a directional association between screen time and poor performance on development screening tests among very young children,” the authors write. “Understanding the directional association between screen time and its correlates, and taking family-based steps to engage with technology in positive ways may be fundamental to ensuring developmental success of children growing up in a digital age.”

Abstract/Full Text

TOPICS:

PEDIATRICS TECHNOLOGY

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Scroll down to see next articlePublish DateJanuary 28, 2019

Likelihood of Engaging in Choking Game Higher in Troubled Teens

HealthDay News — Adolescents with higher levels of conduct disorder symptoms and greater rates of depressive symptoms have increased odds of reporting participation in the choking game, in which pressure is applied to the carotid artery to temporarily limit blood flow and oxygen, according to a study published online January 28 in Pediatrics.

Grégory Michel, PhD, from the University of Bordeaux in France, and colleagues used data from two cross-sectional studies conducted in 2009 and 2013, respectively, among French middle school students. Data from 746 and 1025 students, respectively, were merged and the demographic and clinical characteristics of youth reporting a lifetime participation in the choking game were examined.

The researchers found that the lifetime prevalence of choking game participation was 9.7%; there were no statistically significant differences between the sexes. The likelihood of reporting choking game participation was increased significantly in association with higher levels of conduct disorder symptoms and greater rates of depressive symptoms (odds ratios, 2.33 and 2.18, respectively). 

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“In the current study, we provide a new arena for research by enlarging the field of investigation concerning the risk factors that may predict the course of asphyxial activities,” the authors write. “In terms of prevention, interventions designed specifically for at-risk individuals seem to be required.”

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

TOPICS:

GENERAL PSYCHIATRY MOOD DISORDERS PEDIATRICS

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UK unveils plans to hold social media bosses liable for harmful content

 

LONDON (AFP) - The British government said on Monday (April 8) that it will explore making social media executives personally liable for harmful content published on their platforms, in a raft of new online safety proposals.

The plans unveiled in a policy paper, which also include creating an independent regulator, aim to tackle all kinds of harmful content - from encouraging violence and suicide to spreading disinformation and cyber bullying.

The moves followed steps taken by Australia and Singapore to counter fake news and getting social media companies to play their part to stop the spread of harmful content online.

20 Questions to Ask at Your Holiday Dinner

 

Like many families, ours followed this year’s midterm elections with passion. This will no doubt give us lots to talk about over the holidays and this week at Thanksgiving.

To be honest, this could stir considerable conflict. Our family is diverse: we are gay and straight; Black, white, and Latino; we are Fundamentalist Christian, Liberal Christian, Unitarian, Jewish, Buddhist, agnostic, and Atheist; we are Republicans, Democrats, and Independents; we come from suburban and urban communities. We will be 32 strong at our California Christmas dinner, with cousins, aunts, uncles and grandparents hailing from Florida, Washington, and Boston.

So even if politics are on all our minds, we can give political conversation a rest for one meal, because as a family we are not defined by our politics. I believe we are defined by how well we love each other, by how well we truly see one another. So this year, under each holiday plate, I will place one of the questions below, to spur the kind of conversation where we truly listen to one another, so we can get to know each other better. Even though I’ve known most of the people at the table since birth — or they’ve known me since I was born — we still have so much to learn about each other.

NEWS ARTICALS

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Safeguarding children online is top priority as UK set to introduce new online safety standards

 MORE KIDS 'LIKE MOLLY' 

Health Secretary urges tech giants to do more to protect children as 30 families accuse social media of driving their kids to suicide

Mr Hancock says he is prepared to introduce legislation where needed and will work with firms to ensure more action is taken on removing material leading to self-harm and suicide

By Ryan Sabey, Political Correspondent27th January 2019, 2:15 amUpdated: 27th January 2019, 2:21 am

THIRTY families have accused various technology giants of pushing their children to suicide following the death of Molly Russell.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has written to tech giants including Facebook and Twitter to “act now to stop children being exposed” to the online content.

‘INSTAGRAM HELPED KILL MY GIRL’ Heartbroken dad claims Instagram ‘helped to kill his 14-year-old

 

14-year-old daughter’ who took her own life after viewing suicide posts

Devastated Ian Russell told how 14-year-old Molly died after viewing scores of social media images glorifying self-harm and suicide

By Jacob Dirnhuber22nd January 2019, 11:09 pmUpdated: 23rd January 2019, 6:51 pm  

THE grieving dad of a schoolgirl who took her life has accused Instagram of "helping" kill her.

Heartbroken Ian Russell told how 14-year-old Molly died after viewing scores of images glorifying self-harm and suicide. 

She was found dead just hours after handing in her homework - and packing a schoolbag for the next day.

Her devastating suicide note wrote: "I'm sorry. I did this because of me."

Molly - who went to Hatch End High School in Harrow, Middlesex - had started viewing the disturbing posts without her family's knowledge.

Ian told the BBC: "I have no doubt that Instagram helped kill my daughter. She had so much to offer and that's gone"

"She seemed to be a very ordinary teenager. She was future-looking. She was enthusiastic.

'I have no doubt that Instagram helped kill my daughter'

"She handed her homework in that night. She packed her bags and was preparing to go to school the next day and then when we woke up the next morning, she was dead."

There were accounts from people who were depressed or self-harming or suicidal.

One haunting image shows a blindfolded girl hugging a teddy bear, captioned "This world is so cruel, and I don't wanna to see it any more."

PAEDO HEAVEN' NSPCC says Facebook plans to merge messaging services ‘will help groomers’ and make it

 

Facebook head Mark Zuckerberg has been criticised over his plans to combine his three messaging Apps as it would make it easier for paedophiles to target lots of youngsters at once

By Daniel Jones, Consumer Editor26th January 2019, 2:15 am Updated: 26th January 2019, 2:15 am

A CHILD protection charity has hit out at Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg over plans to merge messaging services — saying it will help groomers target kids.

The integration idea — involving Instagram, WhatsApp and Facebook — is intended to make it easier to chat with pals. 

Facebook is working on a new messaging service that works across the three social networks

For example, someone using Facebook could send a message to a friend who only uses WhatsApp.

But the NSPCC says this would also make it easier for paedophiles to target more kids.

Its online safety head Andy Burrows said: “Bringing these messaging services together creates a bigger pool of children.

“We know groomers send out messages on scale — much like phishing emails from crooks trying to steal money.

“Merging messaging could make it easier.”

As part of the change, all messages will be “end-to-end encrypted” — protection that means only the sender and recipient can see them.

MESSAGING FEARS

But Mr Burrows added: “Encryption makes it harder for social networks or law enforcement to see if groomers are operating.”

Facebook owns all three separate services and is aiming to merge messaging by late this year or 2020.

The networks will remain stand-alone apps.

Social media consultant Matt Navarra said Facebook’s move is in part to fight back against Apple’s popular iMessage service.

FACEBOOK Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp chats are going to merge – with a deadline of early 2020.

 ZUCKING HELL 

Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram MERGING into ‘single messaging service’ – as angry staff ‘clash with controlling Zuckerberg’

All three apps are expecting a BIG change

Helping parents keep their children safe online

 

What age specific advice is available for my child? 

Whatever their age, we can help you to find out more about what your children might be doing online and give you some simple, practical and easy advice on the steps you can take as a parent to keep them as safe as possible.

NEWS ARTICALS:/ Conversations like the ones that ensue from these questions help kids experience themselves as a part of something larger than themselves

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Too Much Screen Time Can Have Lasting Consequences for Young Children’s Brains

 

Growing data suggests that exposing young children to too much time in front of a TV or computer can have negative effects on their development, including issues with memory, attention and language skills.

In the latest look at the topic, researchers report in JAMA Pediatrics that more screen time is linked to poorer progress on key developmental measures such as communication skills, problem solving and social interactions among young kids over time.

Sheri Madigan, an assistant professor of psychology at University of Calgary in Canada, and her colleagues studied 2,441 mothers and children enrolled in the All Our Families study, which followed young children from ages two to five. Mothers reported on how much time their children spent in front of a television or computer screen on a typical day, and also reported on developmental measures by answering questions about their children’s communication skills, behavior and social interactions. The data were collected at the start of the study, when the children were two years old, then again when they were three and five.

Association Between Screen Time and Children’s Performance on a Developmental Screening Test

  

Question  Is increased screen time associated with poor performance on children’s developmental screening tests?

Findings  In this cohort study of early childhood development in 2441 mothers and children, higher levels of screen time in children aged 24 and 36 months were associated with poor performance on a screening measure assessing children’s achievement of development milestones at 36 and 60 months, respectively. The obverse association (ie, poor developmental performance to increased screen time) was not observed.

Meaning  Excessive screen time can impinge on children’s ability to develop optimally; it is recommended that pediatricians and health care practitioners guide parents on appropriate amounts of screen exposure and discuss potential consequences of excessive screen use.

Abstract 


Screen Time Linked to Poorer Child Developmental Performance

 

HealthDay News — Screen time is associated with poorer performance on developmental screening tests among young children, according to a study published online January 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Sheri Madigan, PhD, from the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, and colleagues examined the directional association between screen time and child development in a three-wave cross-lagged panel model. Data were included for 2441 mothers and children and were available when children were aged 24, 36, and 60 months. Developmental outcomes were assessed via maternal report using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, Third Edition.

The researchers observed significant correlations for higher levels of screen time at ages 24 and 36 months with poorer performance on developmental screening tests at 36 and 60 months, respectively (β, −0.08 and −0.06, respectively). An association between lower scores on developmental screening tests and higher levels of screen time at later time points was not observed. 

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“To our knowledge, the present study is the first to provide evidence of a directional association between screen time and poor performance on development screening tests among very young children,” the authors write. “Understanding the directional association between screen time and its correlates, and taking family-based steps to engage with technology in positive ways may be fundamental to ensuring developmental success of children growing up in a digital age.”

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At a time when many people around the world are living into their tenth decade, the longest longitudinal study of human development ever undertaken offers some welcome news for the new old age: our lives continue to evolve in our later years, and often become more fulfilling than before.

Begun in 1938, the Grant Study of Adult Development charted the physical and emotional health of over 200 men, starting with their undergraduate days. The now-classic Adaptation to Life reported on the men’s lives up to age 55 and helped us understand adult maturation. Now George Vaillant follows the men into their nineties, documenting for the first time what it is like to flourish far beyond conventional retirement.

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Too Much Screen Time Can Have Lasting Consequences for Young Children’s Brains !!!

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The results show that there is a lasting influence of screen time, especially when children are two

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Growing data suggests that exposing young children to too much time in front of a TV or computer can have negative effects on their development, including issues with memory, attention and language skills.

In the latest look at the topic, researchers report in JAMA Pediatrics that more screen time is linked to poorer progress on key developmental measures such as communication skills, problem solving and social interactions among young kids over time.

Sheri Madigan, an assistant professor of psychology at University of Calgary in Canada, and her colleagues studied 2,441 mothers and children enrolled in the All Our Families study, which followed young children from ages two to five. Mothers reported on how much time their children spent in front of a television or computer screen on a typical day, and also reported on developmental measures by answering questions about their children’s communication skills, behavior and social interactions. The data were collected at the start of the study, when the children were two years old, then again when they were three and five.

 

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For more info on Julia, ReConnect and the family workshops she offers to help raise kids in the digital age, you can go here.

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